Dear Catster reader,

Almost two years ago, we invested numerous resources and rebuilt the Catster community. With new hardware, software and personnel, we did our best to satisfy the many users who shared their thoughts, pictures, questions, and love for and of their pets with us and friends. It was a thriving community with many users. We hoped, however, there would be more like you.

Times and habits have changed and we are sad to announce that the Catster community will be closing down on July 20, 2019.

Catster magazine, www.catster.com and the associated social media sites are NOT shutting down. We encourage you to continue reading the content found in the pages of the magazine and the web sites, commenting through the mechanisms provided and sharing your ideas and comments with us and your fellow readers.

Instructions for accessing pet profiles were shared with everyone in 2017. The instructions can be found elsewhere within the forum. AFTER JULY 20TH, YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ACCESS THIS CONTENT. And, effective immediately, we are no longer able to answer questions about the community.

Thank you for your support and we look forward to serving you through our magazine and website.

Cheers,
Catster






what do you think

Goolnar HawGoolnar Haw Member Posts: 2,525
edited 21 November, 2008 in Food & Nutrition
i eat wellness indoor health kibble & organic baby food either chicken & sweet potato or turkey & sweet potato. i don\'t care for treats at all even though i love food!!! i get organic cat nip from time to time as well...do you think my diet is ok??

Comments

  • Tina BTina B Vancouver IslandMember Posts: 2,238
    edited 19 November, 2008
    Here is my advice , here is one site that you can read, most catsters know where I stand when it comes to feline nutrition. So I will just direct you to go to catinfo.org I have many more sites for you to read if you would like. :)
  • Beastie_and_the_BoysBeastie_and_the_Boys Marquette, MI / ChicagoMember Posts: 17,807 ✭✭✭
    edited 19 November, 2008
    Baby food might be OK occasionally as a treat, but it's unlikely that it provides complete nutrition for a cat. For instance, a human's liver can convert beta carotene in the sweet potato into Vitamin A, but a cat's liver can't. We need be fed Vitamin A already in the liver storage form as retinyl palmitate. Baby food probably doesn't have sufficient levels of taurine, either, or other nutrients in the needed proportions for a cat's body. Remember, too, to have your human make sure that any baby food that you do eat is free from garlic and onion. It is important, whether you're eating a commercial diet or a home prepared diet, that the majority of what you are eating has been prepared with the needs of our unique feline physiology in mind. =;
  • Jennifer SzucsJennifer Szucs ChathamMember Posts: 3,765
    edited 20 November, 2008
    Maybe in addition to feeding the wellness indoor feed some wellness canned. Even just once a day or a few times a week. I fed my kitten baby food but only to try to wean her off of milk. Cats need more specific nutrition for their body that babies food just wont cut. I feed mine Natural Balance kibble and Natural Balance wet every other day. I know wet is better for them but it is expensive so I do what I can so they at least get some wet.
  • Goolnar HawGoolnar Haw Member Posts: 2,525
    edited 20 November, 2008
    skitty mainly eats wellness kibble as for the baby food it is more of a treat...definately w/ no onions or garlic. as for wet food...why is it better???? sorry for my ignorance but i have never owned a cat.
  • Tara WTara W St. PaulMember Posts: 939
    edited 20 November, 2008
    Cat's are designed by nature to obtain the water they need from their food; not by drinking water. Kibble fed cats live in a constant state of dehydration because of this can lead to kidney problems, urinary tract infections and blockages to name a few. Kibble fed cats also have problems with obesity. Since they are not obtaining the proper nutrition from their kibble, they eat more. The carbs can't be broken down and they get fat. This can also lead to diabetes and other issues. Cats are obligate carnivores. This means that they are built to eat other animals. And that's ALL they're meant to eat. Their bodies are not designed to eat plant matter of any kind. If kitties were meant to eat grains they would have molars for grinding and a much longer digestive tract to break it down. But they don't. They need meat, skin, bone, organs, connective tissue, fat... things that can only come from an animal. Wet food is a better choice for humans who need a convenient way to feed their cat. Be aware though that canned mush will do your cat's gums and teeth no favors and you will need to brush her teeth regularly to avoid plaque buildup and gum disease. It is a myth that kibble helps scrape teeth clean. In fact it is worse than canned food for teeth because it sticks to the teeth when wet and crumbs get wedged between teeth. Ignoring your cat's dental hygiene is a sure way to lose $100 or more a year having the vet scrape and clean her teeth. There are better alternatives to canned like freeze dried or premade ground raw or a frankenprey raw diet or a whole prey diet, but for the average cat owner who needs the convenience of just opening a can... a canned diet is paws down better than kibble.
  • Goolnar HawGoolnar Haw Member Posts: 2,525
    edited 20 November, 2008
    my fear with canned/wet food is that when ever there has been a recalls it is usually canned food. i know wellness hasn\'t had a recall(since i have been feeding wellnes) & i am happy with wellness kibble but i worry about all canned/wet food in general. if i want to add some home cooked wet food to her kibble what can i do...is there something quick & easy??
  • Tara WTara W St. PaulMember Posts: 939
    edited 20 November, 2008
    There's a problem with serving real (raw or slightly cooked) meat in tandem with kibble. Kibble takes 12+ hours to get all the way through the kitty's digestive system. Real meat only takes 3-4 hours. If meat gets trapped behind the kibble it can start to putrefy in her gut and I probably don't have to tell you how nasty that could be. If you're willing to add cooked meat to her diet, would it be such a stretch to go to a raw diet? You never have to worry about recalls because you are buying human grade meats. Kibble is just as likely to be tainted as canned and it is full of a lot more junk, so I really don't think that the worry of the recalls is more of a reason to feed kibble. Look at www.rawfedcats.org After reading through that site, see if it has the ring of truth for you. And if that's not enough evidence for you that cats should only eat meat, then do a little research on some of the ingredients in your kibble and see what "by products", "animal digest", and the like really are. No matter how you dice it, kibble is cat junk food. There are horrible brands and slightly less horrible, but kibble as your cat's main diet is akin to feeding your child Cheetos as his source of nutrition. Carbs are not good for cats and kibble is full of them in one form or another. If you read your ingredient list you may even see multiple listings for grains or potato. This is called "ingredient splitting" and the manufacturers do this so that they can list the carbs lower in the ingredient list than the animal proteins. You may find three different listings for corn or rice. Also know that the ingredients used in pet food are the castoffs from the human food and leather industry. The stuff we won't eat. Hair, hooves, beaks, tumors... it's pretty horrifying to find out what can be listed as an animal protein. Now add to that the fact that in order to make those convenient dry biscuits all the ingredients must be baked at high temperatures so as to make any nutrition that was in there absolutely gone. So what do they have to do to make it a "complete" diet? They have to add all the vitamins and nutrients back in in a synthetic form. Stuff that is all perfectly biologically available in raw meat, bone, organ, etc. There's my moment on the soapbox. I've given up trying to change anyone's mind, but I'd at least like to make a few people think.
  • Chrysee HinshawChrysee Hinshaw Member Posts: 474
    edited 20 November, 2008
    Someone remind me, as I didn't have any pets during the recalls, weren't all of the recalls linked back to gluten ingredients?
  • Jennifer SzucsJennifer Szucs ChathamMember Posts: 3,765
    edited 20 November, 2008
    Atrus pretty much ya. High quality kibble or canned uses all human grade meat. Just ask the good company's. Wellness, Evo, Orijen and the list goes on.
  • Sherry StoneSherry Stone Member Posts: 526
    edited 21 November, 2008
    If you're wondering about a good link to find out about both high and low end kibbles: http://www.api4animals.org/downloads/pdf/PetFoodReport_05-07.pdf Check it out, it's interesting. And yes, the last recall that made the most news(but by no means the only recall) concerned gluten. Both high and low end were affected by it. Here's another link concerning all the recalls that are still happening: http://thepetfoodlist.com/forums/index.php#6 This place lists everything!
  • Tina BTina B Vancouver IslandMember Posts: 2,238
    edited 21 November, 2008
    Kibble was on the recall aswell, and there still is recalls to this day, Samonella, Melamine, toxins, you name it. Here is a site that is good to read you will get an eye full itchmoforums.com
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to the new Catster Community!

Introduce the community to your pet with our Pet Profiles and discover how to use the new community with our Getting Started pages!


Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!