china\'s and first heat

lori monningerlori monninger simi valleyMember Posts: 2
edited 29 December, 2008 in Cat Health
my little kitten china which we just had apodpted is now in her first heat and she's just adjusted to our home. help! is there any pads for the wet back end or dipares made for kittens? we think she's about 5 months to 6 months old. we have to wait till next month middle to get her fixed. s.:-k my human needs to know about vets in los angles that are low priced but are good can any one help? thanks, china and my human mommy lori

Comments

  • Chrysee HinshawChrysee Hinshaw Member Posts: 474
    edited 27 December, 2008
    I think you've been a little misinformed. Cats have no need of "pads" during heat. Also, schedule a spay appointment asap as she will go back into heat very quickly and all the time (as much as every two weeks). Spays can be done while in heat, some people don't like to do this but if you've allowed a cat to have its first heat it may be difficult to find a time when it's NOT in heat after that. And, obviously, you should of course never allow your cat outside anyway but most definitely never while she's in heat.
  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 27 December, 2008
    I don't know very much about the care of cats that are in heat, lol, but have a few friends that are breeders of show cats, and I don't ever remember them mentioning putting something on the back end of the queen, like you would with a dog. They just keep them in a seperate room, away from the males. I have heard them mention something called wee wee pads, but it was more in the line, of they put them in the bottom of the carriers, when transporting cats to shows. I never needed them, I taught mine to pee, just before I load them. As far as vets in the Los Angeles area, you could look in the phone book, they should be listed in the yellow pages, or you could do a search for vets in LA, on your search engine. If your looking for low cost spay/neuter, they usually have ads in the pet section in the newspaper. Congrats on your new kitten, sorry I wasn't more help, maybe others on here can give you a better anser. :):):):):):D:D:D:D:D:):):):):):)
  • SterlingAndTheSTeamSterlingAndTheSTeam Mount OliveMember Posts: 41,262 ✭✭✭
    edited 27 December, 2008
    You can check if any Catster left a review on any of the vets and/or clinics in your area by clicking on the "Local" link button above this forum. In "Local" you can check for a variety of resources which you can telephone to ask for recommendations for a good vet. You can also try calling your local Humane Society for their vet recommendations. Some animal shelters have a vet that does spay/neuter at low cost, but usually the animal has to have come from that shelter. Some vets offer a special spay/neuter clinic for a day, but that is usually in the Spring. I noticed you have other cats. Why don't you take China to their vet?
  • Valerie DurhamValerie Durham Member Posts: 8,724
    edited 27 December, 2008
    I have two breeding queens, and neither produces any appreciable amount of liquid from the spot in question, although they do tend to lick that area a lot. A previous cat, which was scheduled to be spayed, shed quite a bit of liquid when she went into her first (and last!) heat. None of them required diapers, nor have I heard of other people (breeders and cat show people who are showing intact females) using them. As a side note, it\'s said that short-haired cats have more dramatic heats than long-haired cats do. My cat who exuded the liquid was a Japanese domestic short hair, and she howled and yowled 24/7 until I could get a vet appointment. By contrast, my two Maine Coons just get very chirpy and friendly. While it is true that cats can go into heat every two weeks or so, if they are not bred at that time, they can either start having heat cycles that are further apart, or stop having them at all--although in this case, it could be what is known as a \"silent heat.\" In any event, you\'re going to get China spayed, so the problem will solve itself. Just make sure you don\'t let her outdoors!
  • Beastie_and_the_BoysBeastie_and_the_Boys Marquette, MI / ChicagoMember Posts: 17,806 ✭✭✭
    edited 28 December, 2008
    When I went into heat, the first (and only) time, I started spraying/peeing all over the place. Is this what China is doing? I don't think there's much you can really do about it except get her spayed as soon as possible. The "six month rule" has largely been debunked; most vets will spay once a kitty has reached two pounds in weight. If your current vet wants you to wait until China is six months old, you probably should talk to another vet. The sooner the procedure can be taken care of, the better off everyone involved will be! Keep us posted! |:|
  • Annalisa Conserti-JonesAnnalisa Conserti-Jones Member Posts: 5,234
    edited 28 December, 2008
    The "six month rule" has largely been debunked; most vets will spay once a kitty has reached two pounds in weight. If your current vet wants you to wait until China is six months old, you probably should talk to another vet. Or hound your stupid vet about it. Gracie's vet refused to spay her before six months of age. I harrassed them so much and threatened to take my business elsewhere for good that they agreed to wait until she reached about 5 lbs, and then relented again when she came in for her appointment to spay at 4 lbs 15 oz to spay (because I was ready to never go back again if they told me to reschedule the appointment for later). I still think we waited too long: she took a while to recover (she wasn't really herself for nearly a week), whereas I was told that young kittens who are spayed early take hardly any time to heal. Honestly, I think that vets who refuse to spay early do it to cover their own assets (a.k.a. - they don't feel confident as surgeons and want to avoid running into trouble operating on kittens) rather than out of any scientific/medical rigor, so if badgering them to spay China as early as possible doesn't work, you are better off going elsewhere (for the record, we recently had to go to a second vet for Gracie because she needed a quasi-surgical procedure our vet did not offer, and were so pleased with the vet she visited, that we are considering switching vets again).
  • Valerie DurhamValerie Durham Member Posts: 8,724
    edited 28 December, 2008
    Maybe some vets just don\'t like dealing with younger kittens because they are just so SMALL? It\'s only recently, now that the Magnificent Seven are 3 months, that I\'ve been able to see their nails clearly enough to clip them. Imagine if you\'re doing delicate internal surgery...but if some surgeons can do it, then all surgeons should be able to. Regarding recovery time: all my females have been spayed at 6 months or later, and there was zilch recovery time. Remember my Japanese moggie who jumped on top of a 7-foot bookcase in one leap the day after her surgery, with only two surgical staples holding the incision shut? No, it wasn\'t a good idea, but it was HER idea, and no harm was done.
  • Annalisa Conserti-JonesAnnalisa Conserti-Jones Member Posts: 5,234
    edited 29 December, 2008
    Well, every cat is different, but I have heard that the smaller the kitten at age of procedure, the more resilient they are about pain.
  • Beastie_and_the_BoysBeastie_and_the_Boys Marquette, MI / ChicagoMember Posts: 17,806 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 December, 2008
    That is true, too! I was assuming that if China is in the 5-6 month age range (and already in heat :-O), that she is probably already of a size that would facilitate the surgery. I just figured that since the vet said to wait a month that she/he was waiting for the 6-month age. But you're right--it does depend on the kitty!
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