FIP

Darlene WagnerDarlene Wagner MilwaukeeMember Posts: 1,075
edited 23 July, 2009 in Plus Informational
Hi, our mommy's friend just lost a cat to FIP-we think that is what it is called and the vet told her that she will probably lose all the cats. What is that and how does a kitty get it? Mommy is all worried we will get it.

Comments

  • DONNA KELLY-BIRCHDONNA KELLY-BIRCH kenoshaMember Posts: 1,018
    edited 5 July, 2009
    FIP stands for Feline Infectious Peritonitis, and it is a virus gone bad. FIP starts out as the coronavirus, which many cats are infected with (25-40% of household cats and up to 95% in multi-cat household or shelters). In some cats, the coronavirus mutates into FIP. There are two types of FIP, wet and dry. Wet usually produces a potbelly because of fluid in the abdomen and chest. Cats with this form don\'t live very long. The dry form usually causes weight loss, and kitties can live up to a year with that form. Both forms are fatal once kitty is infected. There are tests to tell whether a kitty is suspected of having FIP, but the only definitive test is a necropsy after death. The very young and older cats usually get FIP, it is usually not seen in cats between 3 and 10 yrs. The coronavirus that can cause FIP is easily killed with disinfectant, but can live in the environment for 3-7 wks. However, after 3 wks. it is usually not strong enough to cause infection. Most experts seem to think a cat with FIP cannot infect another cat with FIP since it is a mutation that stays confined within the sick cat\'s body -although the sick cat will still shed the non-mutated coronavirus. Your friend\'s other cats have probably been infected with coronavirus, but it does not mean they will develope the mutated FIP and die as a result. We have fostered and seen foster kitties where one or two in a litter will die from FIP and the others will be fine. FIP is a horrible, horrible disease because there is no treatment, no 100% diagnosis until after death, no real vaccine, and it is fatal. We send purrs of comfort to your friend. Check out peteducation. com and marvistavet.com for more info. There are also other good sources of info on the web you can get from a search. There are some catster groups you can join too.
  • Julie VentrigliaJulie Ventriglia Member Posts: 2,923
    edited 5 July, 2009
    I agree with everything Quincy said. I wanted to add that my sister Tasha and I are from an FIP litter. We lost 2 siblings to FIP, and we are 2 years old now. Also, we were fostered with other kitties that are alive and well today.
  • Jan AllenJan Allen DallasMember Posts: 2,596
    edited 5 July, 2009
    I lived with Mr. Claus for 16 years. He had FIP and I never got it. Good luck!
  • SonnyBono BucherSonnyBono Bucher Member Posts: 3,534
    edited 7 July, 2009
    What are the symptoms of FIP?
  • DONNA KELLY-BIRCHDONNA KELLY-BIRCH kenoshaMember Posts: 1,018
    edited 7 July, 2009
    Dry FIP has nonspecific signs such as chronic weight loss, fever, loss of appetite, and lethargy. Ten to 25% of cats with this form will have neurological signs. Liver and kidneys are often affected, and this shows up in chemistry panels. Granulomas develop (not quite sure what those are) and sometimes they are only in the eye. The pupil may appear irregular and the eye may appear discolored. Some cats can live up to a year with the dry form. We had a foster kitten with the dry form last year. She had the neurological signs, and the vet thought maybe it was rabies. I also noticed one of her eyes was not the same color as the other. After she passed I noticed her body didn\'t stiffen up in the belly region because of fluid accumulation, even though she wasn\'t pot-bellied like the wet form. I asked them to do a necropsy at the vet instead of sending her off to the University for the rabies evaluation because I felt at that point it was FIP. The wet form can start like the dry form early on. Anemia with pale mucous membranes is often seen. Constipation and diarrhea can also occur. The wet form progresses rapidly and soon the cat may appear pot-bellied in appearance because of the fluid accumulation in the abdomen. Fluid may also accumulate in the chest causing respiratory difficulties. Most cats die within 2 months of showing signs of disease. My last one with the wet form looked like a cow right before he died. He had a skinny backbone and hip bone like you\'re looking down at a sway back cow, but he had a huge belly. He lived about a week after I first noticed his belly. His sister got sick and died soon after him, but she had more of the dry form. His other sister was fine when I adopted her out. FIP is a horrible, horrible disease and we pray they will find a vaccine or cure sometime in the near future.
  • SonnyBono BucherSonnyBono Bucher Member Posts: 3,534
    edited 7 July, 2009
    Thank you so much for the information, Paris ~
  • Darlene WagnerDarlene Wagner MilwaukeeMember Posts: 1,075
    edited 13 July, 2009
    Thank you for the information-it was a lot of help, we will purr for a cure!|:|
  • MidnightSonMidnightSon YorkMember Posts: 12,988 ✭✭✭
    edited 13 July, 2009
    My brofur and litter mate D-Max had the dry form and is at Rainbow's Bridge...He lived to be 4.5 eyars old....We shared everything and did everything together..he has been gone over 4 years and I am still healthy..I carry the corona virus but it has never mutated to FIP...We are purraying for you... |:||:||:||:||:||:||:|

    The Nicholas Boys....Midnight Son and Angels D-Max and White Boots

  • Dawn HarmanDawn Harman SpeedwellMember Posts: 1,079
    edited 23 July, 2009
    Thank You for the information. We too will all purr for all the kitties!! |:| |:| |:| |:|
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to the new Catster Community!

Introduce the community to your pet with our Pet Profiles and discover how to use the new community with our Getting Started pages!


Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!