Regretting not getting my cat neutered...

Brittany BlakeBrittany Blake OklahomaMember Posts: 10
edited 7 October, 2009 in Behavior & Training
I am writing about my other male cat who is 2 years old. He is a seal point himalayan. We were going to use him as a stud but we opted not to. For the past 6 months he has been deficating our home and spraying everywhere. Previous to the 6 months he always used the litterbox and we have never had this problem. He also used to like my boyfriend until we moved in together. He runs from him and growls at him. I don't understand this....my vet said if I neuter him now it might help but not completely. Any opinions or answers for his behavior??? thanks p.s. will my 6 month old flame point himalayan follow suit in this behavior if I don't get him neutered??

Comments

  • Leigh PetersonLeigh Peterson AkronMember Posts: 796
    edited 4 October, 2009
    Why wouldn't you get your 6 mo old neutered? Just get them both neutered, it will be much better for their health regardless of the 2 yr old's behavior issues.
  • Annalisa Conserti-JonesAnnalisa Conserti-Jones Member Posts: 5,234
    edited 4 October, 2009
    Agreed with Charlie. If you don't get both of your males neutered they very likely will both (a) run off to mate; (b) try to outspray for territory; and (c) fight each other. Just get it done. For the adult male, what the vet might mean is that he will probably take a while for his testosterone level to go down. He might still spray when he's stressed, or he might not. The vet just can't guarantee that it hasn't become a habit. The good news is that if you neuter the little one before he goes into his first heat, he may never pick up that habit. I know you love your cats, so avoiding (a) alone should be a priority. That may cause them to become lost and/or find themselves being hit by cars or fighting with outside cats who may pass on diseases to your cats through scratching (if that does not already happen with the male who is an adult)! :-O Getting them neutered is the best thing you can do to keep them safe!
  • terri echolsterri echols kalamazooMember Posts: 4,758
    edited 4 October, 2009
    males don\'t go into heat, so there\'s no \"first heat\" to avoid...but they do smell outside female kitties in heat, which will tempt them to try to \"escape\" to obey their biological imperatives. and neutering the little guy early would most likely prevent him from ever spraying. i say most likely, it\'s not 100%.
  • Annalisa Conserti-JonesAnnalisa Conserti-Jones Member Posts: 5,234
    edited 4 October, 2009
    Well, yeah, Kaya. That's what I meant. I wanted to say "sexually matures", but it somehow did not seem to bring the point across. :r
  • Kat WhickerKat Whicker ToledoMember Posts: 1,695
    edited 4 October, 2009
    not to mention neutering elimanates there chances of getting cancer in that area. there is no reason, not even to stud your cat, to not netuer or spay. purebreds should only be bred if they are the poster child for there breed, and are free from any defects via gentic testing. this usually means you are an active show person and have had payed a vet to test your cat. you will have won half the battle after snipping those guys.
  • Amanda LynchAmanda Lynch Member Posts: 3,400
    edited 5 October, 2009
    It's weird, but no matter how much you wash a tom cat (or even a cat that was neutered late), they always have a rancid smell to me. Same thing with stallions (unneutered horses). Unneutered dogs are actually sweet-smelling... A word of warning; do NOT use ammonia based cleaner to get rid of the pee pee. It will not get rid of the urine smell and the cats will continue to pee there.
  • Niki WoodsNiki Woods ManchesterMember Posts: 27
    edited 6 October, 2009
    Given that he's 2 years old, I wouldn't really say that neutering him will change this behaviour - was he completely fine up until recently? It sounds more like something in his environment has upset him. Cats are so sensitive to change, you mentioned that he used to like your boyfriend until he moved in with you - my money would be on either that having maybe set this whole thing off, adding to that change the fact that your other lad is now 6 months and probably hitting puberty. Unfixed toms generally don't like being close to other unfixed toms, your older lad could feel his territory is being threatened - amplified by the stress of the change. Don't blame yourself though, these behavior problems can just as easily affect neutered cats as it can unneutered cats (it is just more likely to affect unfixed ones) For instance I fostered two neutered brothers who were lovely cats, no bad behaviour in the slightest until 3 months down the line I bought a new computer chair and they were both terrified of it for some reason and it set them off spraying round the house like it was going out of fashion! As to your 6 month old little lad, as he gets older he may join in the territory battle so it is up to you if you want to neuter before it happens. You can try other things, such as increasing resources (which is what is important to cats and what motivates them to spray) things like litter trays, food, areas to sleep - these are the things they fight over, so that is something you can look into. I hope it all sorts out for you though, and you get your happy family back!
  • Kat WhickerKat Whicker ToledoMember Posts: 1,695
    edited 6 October, 2009
    that is all true, but we need to encourage this person to neuter the cat. it poses a health risk, not to mention this cat may excape outside and make kittens.
  • Vicky ChanVicky Chan MarkhamMember Posts: 3,542
    edited 6 October, 2009
    Well I guess it wouldn't be a bad idea to get him nutered now if you think it might solve the problem.
  • Arlye DruryArlye Drury DartmouthMember Posts: 826
    edited 6 October, 2009
    Don't you think it is pertinent that your older male started this behavior when you (presumably approximately in the last 6 months) introduced another intact male into your home? I would have the older male neutered and begin re-training. ie: confine him to a small area with at least one litterbox that is kept clean at all times. You will need to make sure that the area you keep him in has been thoroughly cleaned and de-scented.
  • JessicaJessica Long Island, New YorkMember Posts: 1,339 ✭✭✭
    edited 6 October, 2009
    I think neutering would help - an intact male is going to be defensive and protective of their territory, not only due to your 6 month old but any outside cats that come visit will be considered a threat by your intact male. Intact males also are prone to testicular and prostate cancer. Neutering even at 2 years is much healthier for the cat than keeping him intact.
  • Amber SimmonAmber Simmon Member Posts: 2,703
    edited 7 October, 2009
    I think it'll help. I've gotten strays and feral cats all neutered at various ages (oldest was about 7). The tame ones I kept inside def. stopped spraying.
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