Need Prayers Please

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  • SterlingAndTheSTeamSterlingAndTheSTeam Mount OliveMember Posts: 41,262 ✭✭✭
    edited 5 February, 2010
    Go to the beginning of Hazel Lucy's Get Well List forum to links for monetary assistance -- Medical Bills Assistance
  • Michelle UnroeMichelle Unroe Member Posts: 16
    edited 12 February, 2010
    Hey there, We're all so glad to hear that Maggie is showing some good improvement after her odd neuro incident. Just a few thoughts to add to the great suggestions and ideas you've already received. Have you considered consulting a chiropractor? Depending on the laws in your area, there may be some who specialize in critters. Otherwise, many human DCs will also treat animals. I once referred a client of the veterinary office in which I worked as a tech to one when cortisone didn't completely resolve a similar issue in a dog and she was considering euthanasia. The dog made a full recovery after only a few inexpensive adjustments. It's great that the prednisone has helped reduce the inflammation and subsequently the symptoms and possibly the entire issue; however, if you don't see a full recovery, I think a good animal-loving chiroprtactor could help Maggie May. The curling under of her paw is common with neurological injury and often the last thing to return. She may have had a previous injury or weakness not apparent on palpation as it's unlikely a "mis-jump" to cause such severe symptoms. Cats are just so darn flexible, a trait we should all aim to emulate for our own benefit! As for expressing her bladder being painful, if not done with excessive force of course, in an incapacitated animal, it's more like assistance with the release of uncomfortable pressure (assuming the nerve issue isn't actually preventing her from feeling that her bladder is full). I recently provided hospice care for my cat, Haynes, who was having similar issues passing urine and stool. When he still had the strength to push the urine and stool from his bladder and bowel, I would periodically place him in the box and gently massage his abdomen which was enough to stimulate him to go. As his muscles atrophied, he was no longer able to do this so I had to simulate the action of his muscles to assist with the start and finish of his urination (the latter in an attempt to hopefully flush as much of the potential sludge as he had been diagnosed with Chronic Renal Failure four or so years before), but he assisted by handling the in-between time. Basically, after 19 1/2 years, he quickly caught on to that little routine, which is similar to "letting the dogs out". In other words, more time consuming than dealing with a "regular" cat's elimination needs but manageable if desired. Try feeding her green beans, green peas, or pumpkin. Baby food's fine ifor now if she won't eat the whole defrosted or lightly cooked ones right away, but keep offering them by themselves first then with quality canned food if necessary. Sometimes it takes them a while to warm up to them. They're all really good for getting in some extra water as well as fiber. Personally, I think they benefit from the cholorphyll too. That's lacking in most commercial foods; basically cats were created and have evolved quite nicely eating birds, mice, and rabbits in their entirety, which includes the digest of a small herbivore or omnivore that eats it's natural diet. Many foods contain poultry digest, from chickens who eat other chickens, or tripe, which is beefo digest. That comes from an animal with a four-chambered stomach who has most efficiently extracted every nutrient from the contents thereof. (That's why cow poop is black.) Oh, and add a few drops of olive oil to each meal. Carrying Maggie around with you will be helpful to her. Immobility on the outside leads to immobility on the inside. Haynes was not particularly fond of being held but, as he aged, he sought it more and more, finally reaching the point he would literally jump up, from the floor, into our arms...when we weren't looking, it was sometimes challenging to catch him! In his last years, that became an insistent pawing request to be draped over my arm or shoulder when moving and my lap when still. When he was no longer able to move on his own, the last week, we had his first constipation episode I recalled that I hadn't had him out as much since he was recovering from a sinus abscess and didn't feel much like moving. Through it all, he didn't throw up or lose his appetite until the day he died. Such a strong heart that ultimately did beat just for me. I started to get him out and carry him some and found that each time, he would suddenly start meowing then empty his bladder. Gravity works! Luckily I learned quickly to wrap him in a towel. A gently circular massage with a flat hand as well as some deeper abdominal massage would probably feel good to her and may be helpful in stimulating lymph and blood circulation. It's been a while since there's been a post about you. Sure hope you're continuing to improve and would love to hear!
  • KIM JOHNSONKIM JOHNSON NUTLEYMember Posts: 387
    edited 12 February, 2010
    Our prayers have been answered! Thank you all so much for all the great information you all gave! Maggie has started to walk on all four paws again! It happened very slowly over the week. We have her in one room alone, so her brothers don't bother her & she could rest. She weebles a bit, but is walking and not limping on her wrist anymore. She has been using her litter box, eating & drinking and purrring a whole lot. She knows how much we love her! The prednisone is really helping. We never made it to the MRI, so we truly don't know what caused this. I'm thinking a pinched nerve...she must have jumped down from a chair & landed wrong. I'm still nervous about letting her walk up or down stairs though. Again, I am so thankful I still have my little girl with us.
  • KIM JOHNSONKIM JOHNSON NUTLEYMember Posts: 387
    edited 13 February, 2010
    Big problems here today! We finally decided to let her out & take a little stroll into the kitchen to see how she would react with the 3 boy cats. It was awful! The sniffing she tolerated, but Mango jumped on her very hard & bit the back of her neck. She was trying to run, but really should be resting because she has been injured for a few weeks & we have been trying to keep her relaxed. I don't want to keep her separated forever! Has anyone ever heard of boy cats always attacking the female? Do they sense that she is sick with a neurological condition?? I am really starting to wonder if one of them did this to her! They are all so sweet & affectionate to us, but not to her at all.
  • Christina WahlChristina Wahl Member Posts: 164
    edited 13 February, 2010
    Its called domance or mounting in this case. Boys will be boys. If they are not fixed fix them asap this might help. If they already are fixed, get a spray bottle with only water to spray them with when you see them doing this. And yes if they got to wild with her they could have caused some nerve issues which could have been made worse by a trauma. You could wash her or spray her with a orange scent. This should avert them from her for now. Good luck.
  • KIM JOHNSONKIM JOHNSON NUTLEYMember Posts: 387
    edited 13 February, 2010
    Thank you! What type of orange sent is safe for cats? Won't this make them even more aggressive though if they smell an odd scent like that? I don't trust them when we aren't home, so every time we leave, we are putting her alone in my office. She's comfortable in there with her little pink bed.
  • Lisa DaversLisa Davers SacramentoMember Posts: 3,642
    edited 13 February, 2010
    Cats hate the smell of oranges/citrus so it may keep the male cats away but it would probably bother Maggie May too so I wouldn;t use it. The spray bittle is a good idea. If the male cats were ok with her before but are now aggressive its probably just because they have been apart for so long and are treating her like a new cat suddenly being introduced to the house. You could try rubbing a towell on the boys and then on her to make her smell familiar. You'll probably have to go through a gradual introduction process like you were bringing in a new cat. Keeping her separate when you are not there to supervise is a good idea.
  • Molly StrothkampMolly Strothkamp MesaMember Posts: 1,381
    edited 14 February, 2010
    Leo's brother Charlie did the exact same thing to Leo when Leo was having neurological problems. It really freaked me out but they are fine together, now. I think that Charlie was just confused and unsure of Leo walking funny, being separated, and smelling like the vet. Some Catster's told me to try brushing them with the same brush to transfer their scents and that did seem to help.
  • Dawn HarmanDawn Harman SpeedwellMember Posts: 1,079
    edited 14 February, 2010
    You are exactly right Leo! It would be the best thing you can do Maggie May! We are so glad you are doing so well! Keep up the good work. Spray that bad boy too mol! =; ~a~
  • Renee RyzRenee Ryz Member Posts: 2,164
    edited 18 February, 2010
    OH HOW WONDERFUL!!! We are so so very glad to hear that she is doing better! The power of love heals many things! (& the power of the purr mol) really really happy for you!
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 18 February, 2010
    Purrrs to Maggie May--I'm glad she's better. Does she need for me to come open up some whup (it) all over that mean boycat? I'll SIT on him!
  • kristina bkristina b Member Posts: 169
    edited 18 February, 2010
    Yeah, Maggie! Good work and stay healthy! >^..^
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