e-collar for a cat?! WHAT?! *kind of a rant*

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Comments

  • Valerie DurhamValerie Durham Member Posts: 8,724
    edited 11 April, 2010
    Well, a lot of people do use dogs to guard their property and their houses. But it's one thing if you live in the country or the suburbs and have a reasonable amount of land around your house, and another in the middle of downtown Tokyo, where I live. The house where the barking woofie lives is separated from the street by a fence behind which Fido lurks in an area that is at most 3 feet by 3 feet, ready to bark hysterically at anyone who walks by. Fortunately, I only pass by there on my way to the local convenience store, so I don't have to listen to his (her?) barking all day. But in my previous two apartments, the houses directly below my window had dogs that were let outside (in similar postage stamp sized yards) all day long--which meant nonstop "WOOF WOOF WOOF" 12 hours a day. I am very sensitive to sound, and this bothered me no end. Generally speaking, Tokyoites buy small dogs that they keep indoors, but there are a few idiots who refuse to face the fact that most Tokyo houses and yard (IF there's a yard; often there isn't) are not suitable for big dogs. One of my neighbors had a Saint Bernard who was kept in a yard that was barely bigger than he was. Understandably, he looked unhappy about this state of affairs, and would bark viciously if you so much as looked at him. He disappeared after a while, and since the Japanese are known for giving up their pets to a shelter (Japan only has all-kill shelters) when they grow tired of them, I assume that Mr. Saint Bernard was "sent away." On the other hand, there is a very friendly dog that I believe is a Great Pyrenees who lives in my neighborhood--I always see his owners taking him for a walk, and he is kept sparkling white. That dog, I suspect, isn't left outdoors all day to howl.
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 11 April, 2010
    top.
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 11 April, 2010
    Harvey, I feel your pain--and I have a lot more room than you do. It wouldn't bother me if a dog barked at an actual person that was on their property, or even barked for just a minute and then shut up, but around here several my (apparently deaf) neighbors have dogs that are kept in fenced yards, or even worse on chains and are largely ignored...and never stop barking. One man even has about a dozen beagles; aiyiyi! The nonstop baying can be heard VERY plainly even inside my house, and they are a quarter mile away. I don't see how that guy or his immediate neighbors stand it. Thank God I don't work at night anymore--I just got neighbors with MORE dogs who manage to keep them quiet or in the house at night, but are left outside all day while the people are at work, and they yap, yap yap and never stop. I like well behaved dogs, but the yappers are another story--if AC came and got them all tomorrow I am sorry to say I wouldn't feel bad about it at all.
  • Elizabeth KElizabeth K ChicagoMember Posts: 11,036
    edited 12 April, 2010
    Oh my dog is never left in the yard for more than 5-10 minutes at a time. If she does bark when she is outside I always call her back in right away. I do live in the city but have a good-sized yard/space. Those dogs are probably barking due to boredom.
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 12 April, 2010
    Thats the problem; I really feel bad for the dogs, as they never get played with, petted, or much else besides food that I see, and I know that's the problem. If they got some good exercise and attention every day I doubt they would be chronic barkers. But it still bugs me to death...I can't help it.
  • Valerie DurhamValerie Durham Member Posts: 8,724
    edited 13 April, 2010
    I'm sure that Saint Bernard wasn't getting any attention or playtime. He looked clinically depressed.
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