Feline Gallbladder, advice needed!

Paige BritegamPaige Britegam Member Posts: 42
edited 15 February, 2012 in Cat Health
Hi all, Simon's mommy here looking for some advice! Let me just start by saying that Simon is only 2 1/2, but has been to the vet for URI, broken tail, colitis, emergery surgery for swallowing a piece of plastic, and just recently, an e-vet visit for vomiting clear and all around acting odd, in addition to a gassy, bloated stomach. We went to the e-vet and after an x-ray and an ultrasound, we were left with an enema, sub-q fluids, and a guess that he was constipated and has some "sludge" in his gallbladder. After a couple of days of his sleeping more than usual and acting slightly restless, I took him to our regular vet. She stated that in fact his gallbladder is slightly enlarged, and that a full colon didn't necessarily mean he was ever even constipated. So I am a little frustrated that the e-vet charged me $350 for a guess at what was wrong. After our regular vet did an exam, she said that he seemed healthy, and that both his blood work and urinalysis came back looking good. He did have a slight temp (103) though Cornish Rex cats typically have a slightly higher temp than most and she did say that stress and getting worked up during an exam can cause the spike. He is eating normally and drinking normally. She isn't sure what might cause the gallbladder inflamation/enlargement because she said that almost always causes serious illness. So, if you can understand my stress with a cat that is often either sick or getting himself into trouble and having him once again sick without an explanation. Ugh, the financial strain and emotional strain are sometimes overwhelming, but overall, I'm just plain worried about my baby. Does anyone have any experience with the gallbladder and what this could mean? He is a generally healthy cat, considering half of his vet visits were self induced during his crazy kitten stage (though he is still crazy). Please help, or even offer some words of support. I will do whatever I can in my power to keep him healthy but it's hard to avoid the stress of these medical bills. $550 this week isn't feeling too good. Thank you Catster friends, you are always there when we need you!

Comments

  • Paige BritegamPaige Britegam Member Posts: 42
    edited 3 September, 2011
    One more thing I forgot to mention. Last winter Simon had some hair loss on both sides of his hips, and on his neck. It was symmetrical. I switched his food to a no grain, limited ingredient diet and he received a steroid shot and it went away until the height of this summer, where he started losing it again in the same spot. He doesn't seem too itchy but does groom himself pretty frequently. Any idea if there might be a link or if it is just seasonal alopecia? Thank you guys again, your support is invaluable.
  • Heidi FrischHeidi Frisch Member Posts: 453
    edited 5 September, 2011
    Hi; So, I really think you need a referal to a board certified veterinary internal medicine veterinarian ASAP. Here is the thing, they are usually not much more for an exam than the regular vets but they have allot more schooling and experience. It is very much worth it to see one. An ultrasound is a very subjective thing. So the ultrasound is only as good as the veterinarian doing it. Since almost all veterinarians have ultrasound machines in their hospital, they are all offering it as a diagnostic procedure, even though most do not have the experience or training to be doing it. Specialists equiptment is much better too. What it comes down to is do you want the person doing the ultrasound to be someone who does five ultrasounds a week or the person who does fifteen ultrasounds a day. because gallbladder enlargment if it is really enlarged is nothing to mess around with and should be treated right away. Unfortunately for you, you do have a rather high maintnence breed. Sweet cats but you might want to get some vet insurance as these guys can really rack up the veterinary expenses. Not all but some. Good luck. I hope all turns out okay.
  • Paige BritegamPaige Britegam Member Posts: 42
    edited 5 September, 2011
    I should add that tomorrow (due to labor day) my vet is going to contact the internal medicine vet at the clinic I took Simon to to get his opinion on the X-ray and ultrasound. I absolutely am not just moving on from this because Simon is acting normal, but I also am not going to rush to the vet again today for more tests until my vet is able to consult with the internal medicine vet. I love Simon more than I can say and ALWAYS rush him to the vet at the first sign that something is fishy. I am considering insurance but because he has a history of needing veterinary care for various reasons, I have a feeling getting them to cover anything even remotely close to his previous issues will be impossible as it will be seen as a pre-existing condition. I wil always find a way to make it work, it is just stressful and was only hoping I could get some emotional support from my Catser friends.
  • Heidi FrischHeidi Frisch Member Posts: 453
    edited 5 September, 2011
    One big dose of emotional support!!! Sorry it has been rough with Simon. I work at a specialty hospital and have had quite a few of the hairless kitties as friends and I think one lady put it best when she said that These guys are like on part cat,one part monkey and one part alien. They have the biggest personality of all. Also real clowns. It is sad that they do seem to have some health issues. If your vet is talking to an internal medicine vet I am sure all will work out okay. It might be that the gall bladder isn't enlarged and it was just a shadow or something. You never know. Hope he continues to feel better.
  • Joy WaltersJoy Walters Member Posts: 9,276
    edited 6 September, 2011
    I have to agree with Rusty. You can google "feline gall bladder" on the 'net, but a lot of times those things can be more scary than helpful and they obviously can't be specific to Simon B. If you are already spending carloads of cash on Simon, you won't be in for a shock when you do take him into a referral clinic. They are more expensive, but as Rusty says, they are the "creme de la creme" of veterinarians. They have more labs and equipment at their disposal and the whole clinic is made up of board certified specialists. My own experience with referral clinics has been great. My dog contracted Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis as a young pup and we took her to the Emergency Clinic which was right next door to the Referral Clinic. The doctors at both clinics conferred about what was wrong with Cady and because of their care we had her back within a week, good as new and with a definitive diagnosis and medications. A few years later, my daughter's beloved favorite cat, Sophie, swallowed a foamy puzzle piece, unbeknownst to us. The regular vet did x-rays and couln't determine what that blockage was, if it was a tumor or what. She sent us to the referral clinic where the doctors, through another x-ray, determined that because of the shape (it was perfectly square) that it was probably the puzzle piece. It was their expertise and experience that allowed them to make the correct diagnoses. Because it was a fairly straightforward sugery, the vets at the referral clinic suggested that to save money, we take her (and her x-rays) back to the original vet (her own vet) for the surgery. They told us we didn't need to "pay the frieght" for a board-certified veterinary surgeon for this procedure. The clinic staff called Sophie's vet and explained what they'd found and their diagnoses. The surgery was performed by the original vet and Sophie is now fine and cute and loving as ever! Be confident that these "super vets" can find out what, if anything is wrong with Baby Simon. It may cost a few more dollars, but in the long run, you will have a definitive diagnoses and needless to say, peace of mind. Keep us updated!!!|:|
  • Paige BritegamPaige Britegam Member Posts: 42
    edited 6 September, 2011
    Thank you both so much! My vet is going to call me tomorrow after she speaks with the internal medicine vet, they aren't able to call her until then. I hope so much that everything is ok, but of course, if they suggest a follow up I will have him there in a heart beat! I will keep you posted. And you are right, Simon isn't a normal cat. We have two other cats and often say that we have "two cats and a Simon."
  • Denise AntleDenise Antle OhioMember Posts: 255
    edited 7 February, 2012
    cornish rex are not co nsidered as high maintenance. they are descended from barn cats. I don't need baths. their ears need no special care then any other breeds. they are not hairless. Sphinx are considered hair less. they do require bathing and seem to get oily which attracks dirt. When they try to groom themselves their toungues contact skin. This irritates their skin which causes more oil production. You bath them so they dont go.nuts cleaning themselves. You can be more gentle which helps keeps the oil down which attracks the dirt. Less dirt less rough tounge syndrome. Cormish have hair. They lick fur not skin just like any other cat. in fact they have a thick coat of fine hair that repeals dirt and water. I have seen some rex with sparce hair on their hips. But all cats have thicker hair on the saddle and mane regions. Cornish standards place fur as a very important quality and recieve high points for thick wavy hair. Some pet quality rex are not so much. But they should absolutely have hair.
  • Denise AntleDenise Antle OhioMember Posts: 255
    edited 7 February, 2012
    cornish rex are not co nsidered as high maintenance. they are descended from barn cats. I don't need baths. their ears need no special care then any other breeds. they are not hairless. Sphinx are considered hair less. they do require bathing and seem to get oily which attracks dirt. When they try to groom themselves their toungues contact skin. This irritates their skin which causes more oil production. You bath them so they dont go.nuts cleaning themselves. You can be more gentle which helps keeps the oil down which attracks the dirt. Less dirt less rough tounge syndrome. Cormish have hair. They lick fur not skin just like any other cat. in fact they have a thick coat of fine hair that repeals dirt and water. I have seen some rex with sparce hair on their hips. But all cats have thicker hair on the saddle and mane regions. Cornish standards place fur as a very important quality and recieve high points for thick wavy hair. Some pet quality rex are not so much. But they should absolutely have hair.
  • Denise AntleDenise Antle OhioMember Posts: 255
    edited 7 February, 2012
    cornish rex are not considered as high maintenance. they are descended from barn cats. they don't need baths. their ears need no special care than any other breeds. they are not hairless. Sphinx are considered hair less. they do require bathing and seem to get oily which attracks dirt. When they try to groom themselves their toungues contact skin. This irritates their skin which causes more oil production. You bath them so they dont go.nuts cleaning themselves. You can be more gentle which helps keeps the oil down which attracks the dirt. Less dirt less rough tounge syndrome. Cormish have hair. They lick fur not skin just like any other cat. in fact they have a thick coat of fine hair that repeals dirt and water. I have seen some rex with sparce hair on their hips. But all cats have thicker hair on the saddle and mane regions. Cornish standards place fur as a very important quality and recieve high points for thick wavy hair. Some pet quality rex are not so much. But they should absolutely have hair.
  • Denise AntleDenise Antle OhioMember Posts: 255
    edited 15 February, 2012
    Why is the one post. I made keep repeating. And how can I post my cats pictures?
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