NEED to know my cats breed!!!

Sue KraemerSue Kraemer Member Posts: 2
edited 21 January, 2012 in Choosing the Right Cat
Hi Everyone! Newbie here! So today my daughter and I were looking at different types of cats because she would LOVE to have another. I have always been allergic to most cats, but as a child and again in my early 20's I had "tuxedo" cats....thus the reason we got another from the shelter last year. Again, no allergies! Little did I know that they are not their own breed and chances are, I just got REALLY lucky. Tabby type cats are hell on my allergies as are most others. If you wouldn't mind, could you take a look at Spike's pics and see if you can tell the type of breed he is....we would really like to add to the family someday! THANKS!!!:D

Comments

  • Faye DufourFaye Dufour Destrehan, LA/New Orleans areaMember Posts: 4,648
    edited 26 November, 2011
    Spike looks like a Domestic Shorthair. And he would be described as a "Cow Cat", he has the same sort of markings as a Holstein Cow. A tuxedo cats is black with white markings. Check out my cat Benny Grunch (tuxedo) and siblings Jack and Jill, (cow cats). You many have outgrown your allergy, or lucky with Spike. Good for you, getting a cat from a shelter. Please do so agin when you want to get Spike a friend. The New New Orleans Kitties:w):w)(^^
  • Sue KraemerSue Kraemer Member Posts: 2
    edited 26 November, 2011
    Hi there! Thanks so much for your response! Um, nope, didn't out grow my allergies. Was just at a friends this past summer who had a domestic short-hair tabby. The Bynadryl was *just* keeping the worst of the itching and sneezing at bay. There must be something I'm missing. I would SWARE the black and white fur/dander is different. But what do I know? Just going by my limited 3 cat experience. Thanks again!! :f
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 26 November, 2011
    The cats you mention aren't different breeds, just different colors. But who knows, maybe the dander is different! May I also suggest Zyrtec or Claritin (or their generics), not Benadryl, if you have to have it all the time? They are non drowsy drugs. Also, if you bathe your cat every couple of weeks it helps tremendously. Make sure to do a super cleaning on the house at the same timeto get up dander that has been shed.
  • Elizabeth KElizabeth K ChicagoMember Posts: 11,036
    edited 26 November, 2011
    Sorry I think you probably just got lucky... Actually I read that cats with darker fur produce MORE allergens than those with light fur. Also kittens tend to produce less so it is possible if you get a kitten they might not bother your allergies until they get older... One of my mom's coworkers had allergies and said calico cats did not trigger their allergies. So they adopted one of my rescue kittens. Well, long story short they ended up returning her because they were allergic to her. :( Luckily we found her another great home... I would suggest either looking into fostering so you can "test" whether you are allergic before you adopt, or look at one of the cat breeds that is supposed to be good for people with allergies such as Siberians or Orientals.
  • Amber FrielAmber Friel WebsterMember Posts: 690
    edited 27 November, 2011
    I agree with some other posters. I too believe that you really did just get lucky. But if you do want a cat, their are certain breeds, just like dogs, that are better for people that suffer from allergies. I did a quick search on Catster here, of breeds that would be good for those with allergies. An these are the breeds that were listed: 1.Balinese 2.Oriental Shorthair 3.Javanese 4.Devon Rex 5.Cornish Rex 6.Sphynx 7. Siberian Here is the link to the page, if you'd like to read more about it:http://www.catster.com/cat-breeds/hypoallergenic-cat-breeds As far as tuxedo cats producing different dander. I would have to strongly disagree unfortunately. Because my male tuxedo cat,Sylvester, produces just as much if not more than my other cats. My cat Stinkers, a Ragdoll, probably produces the least out of the cats I own. Also, benedryl isn't as effective as other allergy medicines. Actually, I am quite sure if you go to your doctor they could probably prescribe you a stronger allergy medicine. Either that or I have a mild allergy to cat dander, and I use Allegra. It works phenomenally. Hope I helped! =;
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 27 November, 2011
    They need to put Burmese on there too! These breeds (except Siberians) all have very short coats that don't collect dander as much, because they are not thick and fluffy. and the Sphynx muxt be washed weekly which really helps. That is a big help with any cat, and you would be surprised at the cat show people who say they are allergic but are ok in the show hall because most all the cats have been washed recently. . They also make hypo-allergenic wipes you can use to take dander off your kitty. I don't know if it is true that Siberians are non allergenic despite the long and thick coat--I have heard yes, and I have also heard that it's not true, or that it isn't always true. .
  • Amber FrielAmber Friel WebsterMember Posts: 690
    edited 28 November, 2011
    Yea, I thought it was kinda weird seeing a Siberian on there. I am actually surprised by Stinky, as he has long, cotton-like, fur that has little to no dandruff. Also wouldn't a Siamese be on there as well? I have always looked at them to be a fairly cleanly cat. :?
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 28 November, 2011
    You're right; Balinese and Javanese are Siamese with a little longer hair, originally, and now the Balinese and javanese show as the same class in CFA. I think many of these lists are based on claims with no real basis anyway! I do know many breeds of dogs purported to be hypoallergenic are not either, and have to be washed all the time to keep the dander down.
  • Elizabeth KElizabeth K ChicagoMember Posts: 11,036
    edited 28 November, 2011
    Actually even the "hypoallergenic" breeds are not guaranteed to not cause an allergic reaction, even the hairless breeds. This is because the allergen is contained in the saliva and dander, and even hairless cats have these. Some cats just have less. The Siberians are considered low allergen because their saliva/dander supposedly has lower levels of the protein which is the main trigger for cat allergies. However some people could still have reactions to the cats even though the level is low, or could possibly be reacting to something else besides the protein. I have also read that Siberians vary as to the levels of the protein so some may be more likely to cause a reaction. This is probably the case for some of the other breeds listed as well.
  • Kate SchwartzKate Schwartz Fairfax, VermontMember Posts: 11
    edited 11 January, 2012
    When I was in college, the only cat I had was my massive Maine Coon. I had a friend who was allergic to EVERYTHING (and by everything I mean any animal with hair, eggs, dairy, nuts, ragweed, strawberries, etc...). Basically he was allergic to life itself. We couldn't even go into a pet store without his eyes watering up, nose running, and throat closing. One night, he came over and accidentally asleep on the couch. When he woke up, my big ol' Maine Coon was lying right there on his chest. As if the proximity to the cat wasn't enough, Parker decided that was the perfect moment to sneeze right in my friend's face. He immediately asked me to drive him home, freaking out the entire 20 minute drive that his face would swell up and he would get the same hives and closed throat that most cats give him. He was shocked when he didn't have a single reaction to Parker. Every now and then, he would come over and let Parker sit on his lap, and he would pet him. This was the first cat he had been able to touch without a reaction since he was a small child. Now, I'm not saying that all Maine Coons are hypoallergenic, but it never left my mind that my friend didn't have a reaction and was able to handle Parker without a problem. Something to consider at least. I don't know if anyone else has had the same experiences with Maine Coons.
  • Jane JohnstonJane Johnston NMMember Posts: 2,957
    edited 16 January, 2012
    Siberians are one of the few breeds with actually lower amts. of the f1d that is associated with most cat allergies. All lines do not have lower amts, only some of them. It is possible that some cats genetically have less amts of it. Funny thing I have seen various breeds associated with less allergies and the same ones with MORE allergies. Odd odd. I imagine the genetic diversity of domestic short hairs (med. hairs, long hairs) is so high that you'll get them with lower amts of f1d. I doubt it has to do with coat color, but I don't know how that would be. --des
  • Debra HoffmannDebra Hoffmann RidgewoodMember Posts: 1,174
    edited 17 January, 2012
    I want to bring up something to.... I am Allergic to cats. Also to carpets (most kind). Also have asthma, etc. I take accupuncture and don't have much dairy. It helps. With time, our own bodies will build an immunity to the allergens. I worked in an animal shelter. I know!
  • Valerie DurhamValerie Durham Member Posts: 8,724
    edited 18 January, 2012
    A few years ago, I was suffering from a severe allergic reaction to something (turned out that it was a medicine I was taking), and got a battery of allergy tests. I tested negative for cat allergies. However, I have more than a dozen cats, and am not too tidy a housekeeper, and my entire living space is covered with cat hair. When it gets into my eyes, I get an allergic reaction. I would not be allergic to one or two cats, but fifteen... Cat allergies are caused by chemicals in the saliva and dander, but obviously, cat hairs are also tainted with these chemicals. I find that the hairs that get into my eyes (and mouth, and nose, and cover my clothing and my hands) are most likely to be the fluffy undercoat, rather than the guard hairs. All my cats but Spike are Maine Coons, with long or semilong fur. Spike is a typical domestic shorthair moggy (probably 100% Japanese, but he looks exactly like an American moggy), and he seems to shed more underfur than the other cats do. During shedding season, it comes out in big lumps when I pet him. He also has dandruff (perhaps because he is portly, making grooming a bit difficult for him). From my observations, it seems that shorthaired cats shed just as much or even more than longhaired ones. It may be possible to minimize shedding by getting a cat with a single coat. Some breeds (some of the Rexes, Sphynx, Turkish Angoras, etc.) have single coats, and some moggies do too. But if you are going to buy a purebred cat, it is going to involve a lot of money, and you are not guaranteed that the cat is not going to cause you allergy problems. Don't be fooled by shelters that label cats as purebreds--sometimes they are, but usually they are not. If you want to get a purebred from a rescue, try the various purebred rescue services. They are usually more knowledgeable about breeds than regular shelters are, and have a vested interest in saving their particular breed. Shelters want to save kitty lives, period, and will sometimes put a breed label on a cat in order to facilitate its adoption. Be especially wary of cats labeled Turkish Angora. The modern day TA breed is very rare and not likely to show up in shelters to the degree that shelters would have you believe. So, yes, shedding can cause allergic reactions because of the saliva left on the cat hairs. A cat with a single coat may or may not cause fewer allergic reactions. It is said that males produce more allergens than females, and some people say that dark cats produce more allergens than light colored ones. This is debated. However, if you consider that cats shed more when the days grow longer and they are exposed to more sunlight, and that dark colors absorb more sunlight than light colors do, it seems that there could be some truth in this. Are brown (i.e. grey) tabbies considered dark colored? Compared to white cats, yes, but compared to a black and white cat??? I am not sure if anyone has recommended allergy shots. I don't know how well they work with cat allergies, but a friend of mine with hay fever swears by the shots she gets every year from her doctor. I wish you luck.
  • Kelly M-Kelly M- Member Posts: 779
    edited 18 January, 2012
    Hunter is a mix of something, has no real breed. But he does have a single coat. Noticed that a few months after I got him. He just has medium to long fur, no undercoat. He still does shed though, not the way my other cat did. I used to be able to pull clumps of her fur out. Not Hunter though. Its hard to explain. When he does shed, its just this long white fur that imbed themselves in everything. Hunter sleeps in bed with me and usually I wake up with a mouthful of fur, or fur up my nose. (he sleeps against my face, isn't that nice of him?) I haven't sneezed once. However, when I had Hanna (My angel kitty) I would sneeze constantly. She had what I consider thin fur, like cottony down sort of. She had an undercoat, with the dandruff, she was an allergic reaction waiting to happen. Both cats I got from a shelter and have no real distinctive breed. I think it depends on the cat, type of fur, undercoat or not, dandruff or not etc. Also for me, cats with short thick fur causes me to sneeze more than longhaired cats. I take Zyrtec for allergies and it works great for me. Good Luck
  • Valerie DurhamValerie Durham Member Posts: 8,724
    edited 18 January, 2012
    Right. It is not that cats with single coats or long silky fur don't shed, but that the cottony undercoat seems to create more of an allergic reaction. Even my Maine Coons, who all come share some common ancestors, have differing fur types. Harvey and his sisters have long, silky fur that is never greasy and never mats. Umesaburo's children tend to be greasy, and though their fur is shorter, are more prone to mats. All in all, though, Spike seems to produce the most allergens, poor boy.
  • Michele RohyansMichele Rohyans Member Posts: 231
    edited 18 January, 2012
    HI, my mommy is highly allergic to cats, as a matter of fact Bandit used to cause her to have asthma attacks! However, the longer she lived with us the less her allergies began to bother her. At first, we were not allowed to sleep with her, and she used an air purifier at night which really helped, also, she did not let us near her face. Over time though, her system adjusted and while our fur still does get to her at times, she is much better and I sleep very close to her face with no problems. We hope this helps and that you continue to "get lucky". However, it sounds like your system may be adjusting. Best of luck! =D>;c;%:D%~a~ Chiquitita, Bandit and mommy
  • Dawn HarmanDawn Harman SpeedwellMember Posts: 1,079
    edited 21 January, 2012
    You remind Meowma of Me. But we also have a black and white Tuxedo cat. His name is Sootball. Meowma was a Professional Pet Groomer for 12 years, and now she is a Pet Nutrition Specialist for The Nutro Company. She has had dogs in her life before she was born. Now through allergy testings, she was told that along with a bunch of things outside, she is allergic to dogs!MOL.. check out all 3 of our dogs through my Family section, they all sleep in bed with her, along with 1 or 3 of us cats. She has to get injections every month and stays on Claritin (Loratadine). It does not make her sleepy at all. We are glad the dogs do not bother her that much.It can be worse having all the windows and the front door open, like it is right now, then the dogs. Best of luck with the allergies...I know you have gotten a lot of answers to what kind of cat you are, so I wanted to share the allergic part with you. We are all glad it does NOT interfere with the job she loves!
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