AKC Ch.Dog Owner Wondering About Purebred CFA Ch.Cats

Karissa KetelhutKarissa Ketelhut RivertonMember Posts: 733
edited 6 March, 2012 in Choosing the Right Cat
Hello, as the owner of purebred show Ch. Dogs and a breeder I was curious. The temperaments’ of a purebred dog are far more consistent then a mix and I was wondering if it was the same with cats. I’ve had cats before but nothing more than barn cats and cat mutts I guess you could call them. I’ve never really had a cat that I liked or that really liked me. Most of them never really wanted to be with people. I was considering getting a cat when I moved to Oregon, but I want a cat that I am going to KNOW what it will be like much like my dogs. I have no clue where to start (you think it would be easy for me, but I just don’t speak cat!) so I was hoping someone could help me. What should I expect with a good cat breeder? What kinds of health test should I be looking for? What kinds of titles? I know what makes a great dog breeder but cats…that’s another story. I don’t have a breed in mind but I know I don’t want a cat that just straight up ignores you, or doesn’t like its people. I want a friendly cat, loving. Grooming is not a problem to me as I groom dogs every day to keep them in show condition. Mostly a family cat that can catch a mouse if it feel like it.
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Comments

  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 2 January, 2012
    I knbow the vast majority of posters here are going to tell you that purebreds are just as variable as purebreds, but around here we strongly disagree, if you are talking about good breeders and not a person who just buys 'any' cat and breeds it to 'whatyever' as long as it's the same breed. Most of the better breeders are on breedlist.com by the way, in our opinion by FAR the best list of quality breeders; the creator polices the thing closely to avoid having breeders who are not reputable there. We know nothing of AKC, but for us the definition of a good breeder would be the same no matter the species. It would be someone who first and foremost has healthy, comfortable animals that are well socialized. Females would not be bred too often, and never if they are not in prime condition. Animals who don't meet the breed standard would be altered 100% of the time. Those left intact would be outstanding in most departments even if they are not quite show quality for whatever reason. Those who don't have good temperaments typical of their breed would, again, ALWAYS be altered regardless of how good they look. If the breeder hasn't been at it that long they should have mentors/references to network with who are esablished and well respected breeders who have proven their lines over many years. We suggest going to a CFA show and asking people about the cats you like the looks of. Most love to talk about their breeds and will tell you the truth (for instance that Abyssinians are extremely high energy, Orientals in general talk a lot, etc) Of course, there is NO better personality to be had than the Burmese; we love interacting with people, are smart, playful and yet not crazy, and love snuggling. Lots of us teach our people to fetch, and some like wearing a harness so they can be the center of attention while leading their humans around. Meowma says she has only ever seen one scratch made by a Burmese on a human--that says a lot when she and her friends have show kitties who get washed, hauled thru the airport, and all that not fun stuff!
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 2 January, 2012
    Momma forgot to tell you, in CFA "GC" is Grand Champion, "GP" id Grand Premier Premiers are altered cats) RW in front of either of the above indicates Regional Winner, NW is National Winner. Any of these things are good to see up close in the pedigree. Of course good breeders know that just mating two GC does not guarantee anything; best pay a lot of attention to how the two lines have produced in the past when choosing. This is where experience pays off. Meowma is a beginning breeder but is very lucky to have great mentoring with two very well respected breeders who know everything you can imagine about most of our breed in this country. Meowma lets them do the mate selecting for now! All that said, if you want a cat to be as much a part of the family as your dog, you really need to keep it as such; cats left outside to entertain themselves most of the time will obviously not be as interested in people as inside cats. Think about dags left out in a fenced backyard that get maybe 30 minutes of attention daily if they are really lucky. Now think of the difference in your well loved dog. Cats work the same way.
  • Debra HoffmannDebra Hoffmann RidgewoodMember Posts: 1,174
    edited 3 January, 2012
    I am so sorry to disagree with you, but as someone who's worked for the last 20 years with rescue, 'mutts' and pure bred dogs, I think that mixed breed dogs have something no purebred dog will ever have, and thats hybrid vigor. They also are certainly consistant, if treated with love and given proper care. I really don't understand what you mean by 'you've never met a cat that liked you' or 'liked people'. The other evening I had my good friend and her two children, ages 5 and 11 in my tiny 2 room apartment. We had snacks out on the table and the children were fascinated by the cats, 5 of who were in the front room with them. All my cats were absolutely perfect with the children, allowing themselves to be petted and in Smokies case, even touched in areas he's normally sensitive. I believe they know that the children are 'little people' and sometimes don't understand about not touching where it causes discomfort...though we did remind the little boy to please not touch Smokie's back (old injury that causes him pain). My cats, once they know people, are very friendly! They seek attention from people they get good feelings from. They sense when someone is 'good people' and avoid people who may have negative vibes. Every cat I have ever met...including ferals...communicate with people without words. Many do come to develop very loving, deep bonds with people. A former lovely calico cat I had, Kim, came from a terrible abusive situation, and became one of my most social, funny, and engaging cats ever. She had a capacity to forgive that humbles me. Cats are not dogs. They are wired differently. That said, many are very loving and seek attention. Before we even knew Ruffy, he was running up to people in the street trying to get someone to take him home. Smokieboo had been abused and abandoned, yet he let a 5 year old boy who he didn't know pat his back, and run around him making alot of noise. Smokie was kind, because he was shown kindness. Our cats know they have nothing to fear in their home, and are all very affectionate-though all have come from uncertain situations. I would advise, truly, for you to visit and perhaps volunteer with a rescue. You'll, sadly, meet purebred cats there, too. :(( There are many places that will let you go in and get to know the cats-in fact, they'd welcome your help! It's a great way of getting to know cats in general, and perhaps one you'd want to adopt. I believe adopting a cat is the way to go...so many cats are euthanized because there simply aren't homes for them, and many wind up homeless through no fault of their own. Smokieboo was tossed out of his home beause the 'owner' decided she wanted a dog for her son. Smokie was no longer an entertaining kitten toy. Sad, isn't it? If you open yourself to the possiblity that a wonderful cat is a cat that could come in many differnt shapes, colors, sizes, you might be very pleasantly surprised.
  • Debra PietrowskiDebra Pietrowski Sussex CountyMember Posts: 1,833
    edited 3 January, 2012
    If your interested check out the Japanese Bobtail (thats me). We know a breeder right in Oregon.
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 3 January, 2012
    I live with Pandora and the Burms, and I am a rescue. Meowma says to mention that almost every breeder and cat show person she knows has a few rescue kitties around too so it's not like CFA people think we are undesirable. But unfortunately, most of us are somewhat 'projects', and the human has to wait and see how our purrsonality will be even with lots of love, or wait on us to 'become' whatever. I have been here since I was little and love my Meowma. Ieven get to be in the cat show too, and do well since Meowma has worked with me on a little practice judging stand. . But with people who visit the house, unless Meowma catches me and hands me to them, which I am used to from the shows, I will never approach on my own. I am just now letting Meowma's man friend who is here all the time approach and pet me without Meowma, same for Meowma's sister who I have seen many, many times. I think it is entirely reasonable that not everyone wants to take on a pet who 'might or might not' have the type characteristics that they desire. Kittens handles by a variety of people from day one will go into a new home with the personality already apparent, without very much trauma at all. And (good) breeders do guarantee health, etc. Just as many people would not want to adopt or foster a human child from a questionable background, I don't think it's fair to expect every prospective cat-parent to get a rescue cat with the 'what-ifs' that come with them. Almost all of the people who adopted Pandora's litter also had 'plain old cats' that they love, but also had Burmese in the past, or still had an older Burm and wanted another due to their wonderfulness. And please remember--many cat shows do allow rescues to set up and hold adoption events free of charge at the shows, where the rescues have a great chance of getting a truly cat loving family. Many times I've seen several go home with exhibitors, as well. CFA also is THE biggest supporter of feline research, if you count donations from its members, and the WINN foundation is a CFA thing. These things help all cats, not just rescues. So please, if someone has decided on a purebred kitty, give them a break. They will most likely end up with moggies too before it's over with.
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 3 January, 2012
    We met Kisande and her brother this summer, and will tell you they were very cool cats and good looking too. Good choice if you just don't like brown.
  • Debra PietrowskiDebra Pietrowski Sussex CountyMember Posts: 1,833
    edited 3 January, 2012
    And .. let me add Pandoras Pride had/or has some adorable kittens.. im going to steal one of them.. LOL
  • Debra PietrowskiDebra Pietrowski Sussex CountyMember Posts: 1,833
    edited 3 January, 2012
    Next year Pandoras mom is bringing kittens to our show ( I hope) I plan on spoiling one for a day or two.. if she lets me.
  • Debra HoffmannDebra Hoffmann RidgewoodMember Posts: 1,174
    edited 3 January, 2012
    Sorry, Rory, I respectfully disagree. I believe that no one 'knows what they are getting' til they get to know an animal-and that 'purebreed' cats aren't any more likely to have certain traits than any Domestic Short hair. Except, sadly, some do come with more health issues and sometimes behavioral issues. Can I tell you when I worked at the shelter how many purebred cats were lucky enough to wind up with us because of either congenital health issues (we didn't euthanize, so they did get 'special' homes.) I strongly believe that Until there are None, Adopt One. There are just too many homeless cats-including purebreds, that wind up in shelters simply because people didn't understand or want the responsibility of a living breathing creature. And some Purebreeds have certain traits that need understanding and appreciating. I happen to love Siamese cats, but many wind up in shelters because they are sold to people who simply can't deal with the endering traits of many Siamese-such as being very vocal and clingy. (and some have a predisposition to certain health issues-just as many purebreeds do-regardless of whats said about 'genetic testing' (expensive).
  • Karissa KetelhutKarissa Ketelhut RivertonMember Posts: 733
    edited 3 January, 2012
    I really hope I’m not offending anyone; however, I really want to go to a breeder. I don’t just have purebred dogs but mutts too and rescued a few (even cats) my Shelties traits are predictable just as my Shibas, when I get that breed I know what to expect from them and that’s what I want in a cat. I’ve never owned a purebred cat, I’ve always had rescues and out of the many cats my family owned only one ever liked me or like being with people. I do love Japanese breeds, as my Shiba Inu is one, funny thing is they are cat like. They clean themselves just as cats and are very aloof. I do like the bobtail, if I could talk to you more that would be great! Also I was looking at other cat breeds, and came across some exotic breeds. Like the Savannah, Bangles, and Toygers. Does anyone know much about them?
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 3 January, 2012
    You originally asked about CFA, and they don't recognize those breeds, which are crossbreeds of domestic cats and various wildcats (Serval for Savannahs, Asian Leopard Cat for Bengals and Toygers). CFA only registers 100% domestic cats. Given your personality preference, I would not reccommend those for you in any case. From what I have seen and heard from the owners themselves at TICA shows, which I don't show at, these types of cats are not for people who are inexperienced working with cats, due to special needs. I would assume that the degree of wild traits varies also, as the percentage of wild blood varies widely. However, if you like the spots, you might want to look at Ocicats or Egyptian Mau, which both have little round dots but no wild blood. The personalities are different though--both are friendly but the IOci is a little more active and vocal than the Mau.
  • Karissa KetelhutKarissa Ketelhut RivertonMember Posts: 733
    edited 3 January, 2012
    Oh, yeah that’s probably not a good idea for me then! I do like the looks of the Jap. Bobtail and your Burmese. The Burmese are an interesting color. I’ve seen the Egyptian Maus before and do love the coloration. I think I’ll make a list of cats and then single out the best one. After looking at the CFA breeds page I came across a cat that looked very much like the one I had when I was a little girl called a Birman. This cat I had was the most affectionate cat and I was very sad when my parents made me give her up. She would have made a great house cat. But anyway back on track with my list I’ve made so far: Somali (So far my favorite one) Japanese Bobtail (second) Norwegian Forest Cat (third) Birman Ragdoll Maine Coon Burmese Ocicat Egyptian Mau Not much of a short list I know.
  • BambergcatBambergcat Member Posts: 838 ✭✭✭
    edited 4 January, 2012
    My dad was like you in that he liked a certain breed so we had three collies in a row growing up. The first one was my pet and we didn't have lesh laws then. He followed me around everywhere like Lassie. He loved chasing cars though because one did hit him when I was very young. He thought that he was protecting us. Dogs will greet everyone unlike a cat. My cats will pick and choose whom they will go up to. My mix Maine Coon would let me know who the crazies were. He would attack them. He would be affectionate with those people who were comfortable with people and had no issues. I called him "Our Protector". He was very dog like. My two others cats that I have had are very social. Natasha was a little snobby and give her affection to those who gave her space. Alex, my present cat, loves everybody. He wants to sit in your lap and play. He will come to his name and beg for food, sound familiar?......As for breeds, my next one will be a Siberian. I have never had a pure breed cat but they are big cats who have dander that will not bother people who have allergies. It is not completely hypoallergenic but better than most. They are large cats who are very dog like....or cat like in that they love people, perform tricks, walk with a lesh, etc. You have to live with a cat before you have to say that none liked you. My husband would say as you did. Alex follows him around the house and even into the bathroom. Alex just loves my husband and wants to sit on top of him....Go to a cat show with an open mind and check them around...Look at the big cats such as the Maine Coon or Siberian. They are just beautiful cats....but I am prejudiced.....or look at the orange tabbies. One may choose you as Natasha chose us....She reached out of her cage and pat us on the arm... Seventeen years later, she passed on to the Bridge and we miss her dearly...
  • Laurel KowalskiLaurel Kowalski Gateway to the WestMember Posts: 486
    edited 5 January, 2012
    First, What breed of dog do you have? We say Birmans rule! My sister has a Himalayan & we had Siamese. Siamese only cared about when you feed them. Our Birmans are like children, very interactive breed of cats. They follow me around when they are up. Miss me when I'm away. They have no under coats. They do sometimes mats, sometimes. If you were to compare Birmans to dogs, a Birman would be a Poodle. I say they are smart. I thought them tricks. They came out for Christmas to visit with our guest. Our cats talk to us, that might not be for everyone. I love it! I have never had to clear their ears like the Siamese. As I type, they are here with me. If you have any other question about Birmans let me know. I can tell you more. I need to write to Cookie's breeder to see if we can pick up her sister this weekend. The Lucky Tom cat show is next weekend & she will be busy. Cookie's sister is Dee Dee, that we are getting. www.templkatz.com - Cookie's breeder www.abirwood.com - Brownies's breeder
  • Laurel KowalskiLaurel Kowalski Gateway to the WestMember Posts: 486
    edited 6 January, 2012
    First, What breed of dog do you have? We say Birmans rule! My sister has a Himalayan & we had Siamese. Siamese only cared about when you feed them. Our Birmans are like children, very interactive breed of cats. They follow me around when they are up. Miss me when I'm away. They have no under coats. They do sometimes mats, sometimes. If you were to compare Birmans to dogs, a Birman would be a Poodle. I say they are smart. I thought them tricks. They came out for Christmas to visit with our guest. Our cats talk to us, that might not be for everyone. I love it! I have never had to clear their ears like the Siamese. As I type, they are here with me. If you have any other question about Birmans let me know. I can tell you more. I need to write to Cookie's breeder to see if we can pick up her sister this weekend. The Lucky Tom cat show is next weekend & she will be busy. Cookie's sister is Dee Dee, that we are getting. www.templkatz.com - Cookie's breeder www.abirwood.com - Brownies's breeder
  • Karissa KetelhutKarissa Ketelhut RivertonMember Posts: 733
    edited 5 January, 2012
    My two dog breeds are Shiba Inus (A Japanese breed that acts very cat like) and the Sheltie. Our website if you would like to visit: http://pinnaclekennels.weebly.com/ If you see any errors on our site let me know! ------------------------------------------------------------ So I have narrowed my breed list down to these breeds. Ragdoll Birman Somali And these are some of the breeders I like Somali: http://tajharasomalis.com/ Ragdoll: http://www.enchantacats.com http://www.ragbigboy.com/index.php Birman: www.abirwood.com http://www.kissyfursbirmans.com/Welcome/Welcome.htm http://www.forevermorebirman.com/AboutUs/Foreveraboutus.htm I really love the colors and looks of these cats and from what I have read and some have told me here they are very nice cats. If owners have any more to say about their experiences with these breeds it would be MUCH appreciated. None of my dogs are big so I am hoping they will get along with a new cat or two, we have cats (barn cats) and they don’t mind the dogs and the dogs don’t mind them so I am assuming they will be fine.
  • Gimli_TGMGimli_TGM HurstMember Posts: 29,929 ✭✭
    edited 6 January, 2012
    Manx cats are very mellow, even tempered, loving and social. My sister K.C. and I aren't purebred, but our cat dad possibly was. He was left behind in an apartment complex by his previous owners, our human mom guesses, when they moved away. Our cat mom was a shorthaired blue tabby with a tail. All 4 of us in the litter had different tail lengths. Manx cats are said to be "a dog lover's cat" and some like to fetch stuff. I like to drag my mom's clothes around the house and make trilling noises while I am doing that. I have a special meow/call for my mom when I am looking for her. I am very attached to her and sleep by her every night. :D
  • Yvonne SummersYvonne Summers AdelaideMember Posts: 2
    edited 6 January, 2012
    Purebred cats also tend to follow the breed characteristics closely. Reputable cat breeders breed for that particular personality too in their breed, because appearance and personality is what separates the various cat breeds. Remember a cat is a cat first and one of its breed second so read up on cat behaviour. All good cat books have a chapter on that, some with drawings of cat postures and expressions to help assess what the cat is intending. Mum's baby for 18years was a BURMESE and they are so loving to owners and snuggle with dogs and other cats - they are naughty and nothing scares them so they just ignore discipline. When disciplining a cat Mum growls a firm "NO" or "OFF" or a shot with a water pistol or spray water bottle. I'm RUSSIAN and aloof but affectionate so I wouldn't suit you but I hear BIRMANS are a great choice if you want a long hair cat with affectionate friendly nature, intelligence and fun to have around. Whatever breed you decide on, choose a kitten that enjoys you picking it up, being held and cuddling it and for a pet choose a boy to be neutered. Girls are fun but boys are more snuggly. Hope this helps your choice.
  • Laurel KowalskiLaurel Kowalski Gateway to the WestMember Posts: 486
    edited 7 January, 2012
    I love your website. I had worries your had those dogs big as a pony. Do you have a color or pattern in mind? I'm not big into torties. Red points are not my first color choice. I got a book that change my world for Sams back in 1995. It was a DK Eyewitness Handbooks on Cats. Are you looking for a kitten? Are you open to an older cat that are under two? I have meet Bogey from Templkatz. He was so sweet & friendly. He just loved me up as I was a complete stranger. Jan does a lot of lynx Birmans. She said that she was going to recreate the same breeding as Cookie with Dev & Elvis. We are picking up Deedee, Cookie's sister, today from Jan. She turned 4 yesterday. Jan is local here in St. Louis. Julie is just outside of Jacksonville, IL. Jan & Julie maybe taking their young cats to the Lucky Tom cat show here in St. Louis next weekend. If you are interested in any of their young cats you can contact them.
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 7 January, 2012
    One of Meowma's friends shows Birmans; you can see some if you look at Golden Seal Birmans on Facebook. We can tell you that their kitties are very, very sweet and good looking too!
  • Denise AntleDenise Antle OhioMember Posts: 255
    edited 21 February, 2012
    Get a Cornish Rex. They love dogs and hate other cats. They are Hardy and often live to 20+years. Don't shed a mass amount. They smell like honey. But need to be indoors kept very warm allowed to sleep withany one they choose. This may be you or your kid or your poodle. Usually it means taking turns. Their body temp is 103 which makes them a living hotpad. All family's with a Cornish Rex fight over them. They love kids and dogs but other cats are their mortal enemies
  • Denise AntleDenise Antle OhioMember Posts: 255
    edited 21 February, 2012
    Oh my friend took her lab to Westminster. A lab LOL. What's. Your breed?
  • Lynda SmithLynda Smith Member Posts: 25
    edited 23 February, 2012
    As a dog breeder I am sure that you understand that no matter what breed of cat you decide upon, you know to research the genetic traits - any potential health problems associated with the breed such as PKD with Persians, HCM with Maine Coons etc. I am a silver/golden Persian breeder and am just a bit biased about the breed. Don't know that I would ever own another breed. I would suggest going to a cat show and talking with the exhibitors.
  • Kelly M-Kelly M- Member Posts: 779
    edited 23 February, 2012
    From one of your posts: "I do like the looks of the Jap. Bobtail and your Burmese. The Burmese are an interesting color. I’ve seen the Egyptian Maus before and do love the coloration. I think I’ll make a list of cats and then single out the best one." It seems like you're looking at the physical aspect of purebred cats. If you want one that is dog-like, focus on that first. Make your list of breeds and then decided on what you want for looks. For instance, I love physically large cats, but I would never get a Savannah. Too wild for me. There are a lot of things to think about. I don't think you should just focus on "dog-like". How do you feel about: Vocality? Engergy Level? Amount of time for grooming? Dog/cat/animal friendly? Independence? Intelligence? If you know what you want, search for a good breeder. Then you will probably have to wait until their are kittens available, if that is what you want. Sometimes breeders have alters or retired breeders for adoption at a lower price. Be prepared to spend at least several hundred dollars for a purebred kitten. I personally go with shelter cats. Although in the distance future I might want a purebred Maine Coon. I think my Hunter is the best of both worlds. A Shelter cat who has the look and energy of a Turkish Van. The size of a medium Maine Coon. The coat of a Maine Coon and Ragdoll, and the limp/floppyness of a Ragdoll when lifted. The vocality of a Turkish Van and the trill of a Maine Coon. Oh and not to mention 100% dog like. =; Good Luck in your search!
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 23 February, 2012
    With all the above said, Meowma says she forgot to add, go to a cat show and talk to breeders, and see how the cats actually are. When she was deciding, Meowma know she wanted a short haired cat that didn't get huge, with a round head. Personality wise, she wanted a loving but still playful cat that isn't too hyper. After narrowing down to a short list of 3 breeds, she spent more time with those 3 at the shows. Folks, when she hung around the Burms for a couple of hours, she was HOOKED. Obviously--we are perfect!~
  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 23 February, 2012
    I didn't read everyones replies, but there is a show on Animal Planet, forget the name now, but it goes thru the various breeds. It also says, each cat is an individual. Maine Coons are know to be very laid back, nothing, at all, bothers Bump, he is what the horse people, would call bomb proof. The only thing he demands, is to be fed on time. I have also seen Maine Coon's at shows, that are real grouchy, and are not showable. They are all individuals. Cowboy, Rory and Kuju's mommy's met at Garden State back in July. We had a blast! Looking forward to Garden State this season, the big man might come this season. :)):-h=;:xo:|:|
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 23 February, 2012
    Meowma wants to go back, but has promised I can retire at the end of this season. I like shows ok, and o ok but I believe I should get by on looks alone. I love to play at home, but not so much with the judges at the show. And I'm just such a lump on the stand that the juge always selects me to demonstrate cat tooth brushing, vsrious components of the classic tabby pattern, ear hygeine or other such drivel. Hopefully there will be a Burmese or bombay kitten here that is good enough to haul to NJ; I would like to go and just nanny the kitten and eat people food which I only get at shows. (Meowma here--ha ha, dude, I intend to hang with my friends and not do the vending this year. You just might get a surprise, namely unretiring for a minute)
  • Leanne FroebelLeanne Froebel Member Posts: 1,730
    edited 24 February, 2012
    Purebreds are definitely more predictable than shelter kittens... but personality can still vary (just as with dogs). Make sure you research the breeds you are intersted in carefully. Some breeds, like Abyssinians are generally extremely active and playful. Siamese are often very vocal. Persians are generally very calm and laid back, but need a grooming committment from their owners. I'm a European Burmese, which tend to be very affectionate, playful, people orientated, outgoing and friendly. European Burmese and Burmese (and Tonkinese) are not for people who cannot devote a lot of time and attention to the cat. Make sure the breeder is rasing the kittens "underfoot" and socializing them. I agree with the suggestion of visiting a cat show. There you will get to see many breeds, and get to talk to breeders/exhibitors. As has been said, not all associations recognize all breeds. CFA does not recognize any breeds with wild cat blood (Bengals, Savannahs, Serengeti, Chausie) or any breeds with mutations considered unhealthy (Munchkins). There are three major associations in North America: CFA (Cat Fanciers' Association), TICA (The International Cat Assoication), and ACFA (American Cat Fanciers Association). Breeders should have their cattery and cats/kittens registered with at least one of these associations. Make sure you research how to find a reputable breeder. CFA, ACFA, and TICA have websites with breed descriptions, show calendar schedule, and breeder listings. Once you decide on a breed, and have found a reputable breeder, you need to decide if you want a kitten or a retired young adult. Breeders sometimes have retired young adults available who are done with their show careers and having kittens. These retired adults are often available at a reduced price. There are some purebred rescue organizations out there too. Vinny and I are both European Burmese. Rider is a Tonkinese. We are all registered in CFA and ACFA. Mom can highly recommend both breeds! We are also show cats. You will need to decide if you want a "pet quality" kitten or a "show quality" kitten. If you have no interest in showing, pet quality is just fine. If you have any interest in showing, make sure you let the breeder know so they can pick a kitten they feel may do well at the shows. Just FYI, you can show a spayed or neutered cat. The cat world has a class called Premiership or Alters for spays/neuters... and the competition is just as fierce as the intact cats.
  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 25 February, 2012
    Hey Rory! :-h Better you is a very well behaved kitty, and the judgeys can use you for demonstation, than being a baddy boy kitty on the table. I hopes, even if your mommy does retire you, she still brings you. My mommy just loved you, she loved kissing and hugging you, and carrying you to your rings, you is such a cutey little guy! My mommy really misses you. She was gonna smuggle you in my carrier, and takes you homey with us. :xo:
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 25 February, 2012
    She better have a bigger carrier next time, I am growing. :))
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