New Kitten, Two Angry Seniors

Jolyssa StephanieJolyssa Stephanie Member Posts: 1
edited 5 September, 2014 in Kitten Corner
Hi! So just looking for some advice, but will give you the whole story so you get a better idea. At the beginning of July I went to my patio door & saw this very small kitten sitting beside my BBQ. He ran away once he noticed that I was looking at him but came back a short time later. The next day this little guy was laying on my porch steps but ran once I came to them. We continued to watch this little guy to see if there were any other kittens & make an attempt to catch him but he wanted no part of it. I followed him one day to see where he was going only to learn that he was living under my shed. I started feeding him, well trying to feed him. He would get a little bit of food but the older stray cats in the neighbor hood would get the food. Fast forward 2 weeks, we saw the little guy sitting on a dirt pile in our yard & noticed that he had a wound on his back, unsure of what this wound was or how it happened we tried to catch him to clean it & take care of it. It took a couple of days & as those days went by his health was declining. He had a fading look in his eyes, I knew he was dying at this point. The next day we found him laying on the ground with his head on the ground, I honestly thought he was dead. My boyfriend put on a pair of gloves and grabbed him, brought him in the house. This poor little baby smelt so bad, so my boyfriend decided to give him a bath & while he bathed him I decided to call the humane society to see what I could do about this wound. Once on the phone with them I was asked if the wound was long or if it was a hole. I was unsure but said I would look, the lady then explained that if it was a hole that it was likely a fly egg & I would see the larva come up to breathe if this was the case. I went & looked while he was being bathed & sure enough, the larva came up to breathe. I was then told that this larva would have to be removed by a vet. The poor baby also had a very bad cold. At this point, it was the weekend & the vet would not be opened until Monday & this little baby was following us around but because this wound was draining so much he wasn't allowed in the house. I spent the next two days with the exception of bedtime outside with him. We set up a blanket in a crate & put it in the shed for him to sleep in. Monday comes around & we make him an appointment for the vet, 3 o'clock that afternoon. I spent all day outside with him until we had to leave. Once we got to the vet, he was weighed - 1.8 lbs & he was determined to be only 8 weeks old. The vet techs were amazed by the larva as they had never seen anything like that before. The vet was also amazed, he said this was something you see maybe once a year. He explained that this little baby was very sick but he was going to try his very best to save his life explaining that he would take the larva out of him & take care of his terrible case of ear mites. Once the larva was removed, he was then put under a very low dose of anesthetic so the vet could open him up to clean the around & ensure that there were no more under the skin. Clean ears, 3 stitches later & a very dopey kitten later, we were on our way home. Once at home it was then decided that he would be an indoor cat despite already having two indoor/outdoor cats. He explored around the house. My two older cats during the summer months spend a good majority of their time outside, only coming inside to eat & sometimes to have a little nap. Once they realized that there was a kitten in the house they were not impressed. My oldest cat, she is 10, would not eat unless the kitten was in my bedroom with the door shut. The other cat, he is 9, also would not eat unless the kitten was no where in sight. Fast forward to today, my little man who we have named Jax is 12 weeks old. My other two cats hate him. It's not fair to him that he has to be put into a room when they come in so we are working on keeping him out but trying to teach him that when they are eating he cannot eat their food with them. He is very curious of the other two cats & wants to go sniff them & play with them but they want no part of it. They will run to the door to be let out, hiss & growl at him & my 9 year old male (10 year old is female) will attack him his claws are not out when he does but he still attacks him. Is there any way that I can help my two older cats get used to him? He is apart of the family now & is not going anywhere. I am worried with the colder weather coming up because I don't want my two older cats to be outside when theres 3 feet of snow & its -30. Will they ever get used to him & be able to live with him? Please help. Thank you :) Jax's mommy!

Comments

  • alyssa pearl balunesalyssa pearl balunes Member Posts: 2
    edited 25 August, 2014
    well,that's very usual...they can get used to it.Plan ahead Your existing cat (or cats) will have established territory and the introduction of another, albeit a little kitten, is not necessarily going to be well received. It's important to ensure that the resident cat is not given the impression that it is under siege. When choosing your new kitten, have your cat’s personality in mind. For example, don’t purchase a very confident and outgoing kitten if your existing cat is timid or shy. Arrange to collect your kitten on a day when you know you will have plenty of time to devote to settling it in, for example a couple of days over a weekend or during a time when you are not at work and the household is relatively peaceful. Some planning is necessary to prepare the home for the new arrival and the introduction process so, before the kitten arrives, purchase or hire a kitten pen (or large dog 'crate' of similar construction) and position it in a room that your existing cat doesn’t particularly favour, for example a spare bedroom. A kitten pen is a large metal cage with a solid floor that is normally used for kittening queens or cats after surgery that need to be confined. It is quite large with plenty of room for a bed, toys, food, water and a litter tray. They are easily collapsible to enable the pen to be moved from room to room. Think cat! Think cat once your new kitten arrives and think scent first. Your home will have a scent 'profile' which is familiar and reassuring to your resident cat. It will consist of all those things that go on there, the dogs, the children, the hobby equipment, the cleaning materials, the food you like and so on, all mixed in with your cat’s own scent. All the corners of your furniture will have been wiped by your cat’s chin and face, the doorposts have been brushed by its coat and the carpet will often bear the marks of claw sharpening and the scent from its paws. Your home is well and truly possessed by your cat. What you have to try to do is work in the scent of the new kitten so that it, too, is incorporated into the accepted household aroma. This comes down, initially, to you. You have to try to spread and mix the scents of the cats. You’re working with the invisible, but have faith that there’s actually something there! Stroking your cat and the kitten regularly and swapping bedding will enable the kitten’s smell to become familiar and incorporated into the communal, household scent. The first meeting The door to the kitten’s room should remain closed initially, allowing the kitten to exercise within that space when your other cat is not around. The kitten’s food, water, toys and bed can be positioned outside the pen but the litter tray should remain within it. When the initial contact between kitten and cat takes place it may be helpful to distract the kitten with food. The door to the room can be opened while the kitten is eating in the cage (with the cage door shut). It may be helpful, to allow the kitten to feel secure, if there is a covered box within the cage so that the kitten can hide from any unwanted attention as your other cat explores. If you wish, a small bowl of your cat’s favourite food can be located a comfortable distance away to encourage eating in safety (bearing in mind that cats are solitary feeders) without being deterred by the sight of the kitten. Your cat should be allowed to explore the cage without intervention. It is important to provide attention to the existing cat during this transitional period but not to exceed the amount normally accepted and enjoyed. Existing routines should be maintained to demonstrate that the kitten represents no loss of resources or enjoyment. Once kitten and cat appear calm when in close proximity to each other (with the kitten inside and the resident cat outside the cage), the pen can be moved to other rooms (of increasing importance to the resident cat), leaving out those particularly favoured areas where the adult cat spends the majority of its time. Depending on progress, several weeks of this regime may be needed before opening the cage and letting the cats get to know each other, some introductions can take considerably less time and the kitten accepted fairly quickly. When the cage door is left open and the kitten is allowed to mix freely the contact between adult and kitten should still be closely supervised. It may be advisable to separate the kitten and adult cat when supervision is not possible, at least until their relationship is firmly established. Both kitten and adult, in the long-term, should be provided with their own resources (bed, litter tray, food bowls, water bowls etc) positioned in separate locations and their own private areas where they can rest undisturbed by the other.|/h/|;c; hope it helps..i haVE experienced it before when Alyssa,my mommy ,kept me,..
  • alyssa pearl balunesalyssa pearl balunes Member Posts: 2
    edited 25 August, 2014
    well,that's very usual...they can get used to it.Plan ahead Your existing cat (or cats) will have established territory and the introduction of another, albeit a little kitten, is not necessarily going to be well received. It's important to ensure that the resident cat is not given the impression that it is under siege. When choosing your new kitten, have your cat’s personality in mind. For example, don’t purchase a very confident and outgoing kitten if your existing cat is timid or shy. Arrange to collect your kitten on a day when you know you will have plenty of time to devote to settling it in, for example a couple of days over a weekend or during a time when you are not at work and the household is relatively peaceful. Some planning is necessary to prepare the home for the new arrival and the introduction process so, before the kitten arrives, purchase or hire a kitten pen (or large dog 'crate' of similar construction) and position it in a room that your existing cat doesn’t particularly favour, for example a spare bedroom. A kitten pen is a large metal cage with a solid floor that is normally used for kittening queens or cats after surgery that need to be confined. It is quite large with plenty of room for a bed, toys, food, water and a litter tray. They are easily collapsible to enable the pen to be moved from room to room. Think cat! Think cat once your new kitten arrives and think scent first. Your home will have a scent 'profile' which is familiar and reassuring to your resident cat. It will consist of all those things that go on there, the dogs, the children, the hobby equipment, the cleaning materials, the food you like and so on, all mixed in with your cat’s own scent. All the corners of your furniture will have been wiped by your cat’s chin and face, the doorposts have been brushed by its coat and the carpet will often bear the marks of claw sharpening and the scent from its paws. Your home is well and truly possessed by your cat. What you have to try to do is work in the scent of the new kitten so that it, too, is incorporated into the accepted household aroma. This comes down, initially, to you. You have to try to spread and mix the scents of the cats. You’re working with the invisible, but have faith that there’s actually something there! Stroking your cat and the kitten regularly and swapping bedding will enable the kitten’s smell to become familiar and incorporated into the communal, household scent. The first meeting The door to the kitten’s room should remain closed initially, allowing the kitten to exercise within that space when your other cat is not around. The kitten’s food, water, toys and bed can be positioned outside the pen but the litter tray should remain within it. When the initial contact between kitten and cat takes place it may be helpful to distract the kitten with food. The door to the room can be opened while the kitten is eating in the cage (with the cage door shut). It may be helpful, to allow the kitten to feel secure, if there is a covered box within the cage so that the kitten can hide from any unwanted attention as your other cat explores. If you wish, a small bowl of your cat’s favourite food can be located a comfortable distance away to encourage eating in safety (bearing in mind that cats are solitary feeders) without being deterred by the sight of the kitten. Your cat should be allowed to explore the cage without intervention. It is important to provide attention to the existing cat during this transitional period but not to exceed the amount normally accepted and enjoyed. Existing routines should be maintained to demonstrate that the kitten represents no loss of resources or enjoyment. Once kitten and cat appear calm when in close proximity to each other (with the kitten inside and the resident cat outside the cage), the pen can be moved to other rooms (of increasing importance to the resident cat), leaving out those particularly favoured areas where the adult cat spends the majority of its time. Depending on progress, several weeks of this regime may be needed before opening the cage and letting the cats get to know each other, some introductions can take considerably less time and the kitten accepted fairly quickly. When the cage door is left open and the kitten is allowed to mix freely the contact between adult and kitten should still be closely supervised. It may be advisable to separate the kitten and adult cat when supervision is not possible, at least until their relationship is firmly established. Both kitten and adult, in the long-term, should be provided with their own resources (bed, litter tray, food bowls, water bowls etc) positioned in separate locations and their own private areas where they can rest undisturbed by the other.|/h/|;c; hope it helps..i haVE experienced it before when Alyssa,my mommy ,kept me,..
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