Would This Fit Under This Cat-egory?

Darcie MesherDarcie Mesher Spruce GroveMember Posts: 132
edited 30 September, 2005 in Food & Nutrition
I know it's food related so here it goes : I'm looking for cat treat recipes for a cat treat website I'm making! So far I have one. >^.^< Mom say she'll only do it if I get enough hits, a.k.a. people who'll volunteer recipes. Any takers?

Comments

  • edited 27 February, 2006
    Healthy cat treats are tricky, since cats are meat-eaters and they don\'t handle grains that well. My mom isn\'t very good with meat, so most of our treats are things like freeze-dried chicken livers, which she buys at a health food store.
  • Darcie MesherDarcie Mesher Spruce GroveMember Posts: 132
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Thanks a bunch Alex, which reminds me to tell you that whatever is posted on the site (when and if we get it up) are TREATS not food and should be given in moderation.
  • edited 27 February, 2006
    Treats are food though. Anything we eat is part of our diet and has an effect on our health. Most of the treat recipes that we\'ve seen contain corn meal or wheat flour, neither of which is healthy for kitties. Sometimes, they also contain downright unhealthy stuff like garlic, which is toxic to kitties. So, we\'re going to stick with our meat treats, which are yummy and healthy and make our vegetarian mommy gag! That\'s just us though because I have nasty food sensitivities. For cats who don\'t have my medical issues, homemade treats are definitely better than Pounce or whatever, which are full of all kinds of horrible things. If you make treats yourself, at least you know what is going into your kitty and that can only be a good thing. Good luck with your site, even though I don\'t have anything to contribute. PURRRRZ :-3
  • Darcie MesherDarcie Mesher Spruce GroveMember Posts: 132
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Ooh, I'm going into debate mode! Look out: They are food in the sense that they are edible and we do eat them, but not in the sense that they should be a regular part of our diet. They will, actually, make some cats sick if eaten in excess. They are, as their name states, treats. The definition of treat: n. A source of a special delight or pleasure, something irregular. As in a source of joy or happiness I rest my case. :3 Now, any takers!?
  • edited 27 February, 2006
    That\'s interesting. Let\'s use an analogy to see if I understand what you are trying to say here. I really love lobster. However, lobster is very expensive and I can only afford to eat lobster once or twice a year. For this reason, I consider lobster to be a marvelous treat. Thus, based on your apparent assertion that \"food\" and \"treat\" are mutually exclusive categories, lobster is not food. Is that correct?
  • Darcie MesherDarcie Mesher Spruce GroveMember Posts: 132
    edited 27 February, 2006
    -nodnod- Cooorrrrrrect! Lobster + Exspensive + Rare = Treat not food. Now if it was regular and was a nescessary part of the feline diet, it would be food.
  • edited 27 February, 2006
    You seem to be operating with an odd definition of the word \"food\" that does not conform to standard English. Here is the primary definition of \"food\" from Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary: material consisting essentially of protein, carbohydrate, and fat used in the body of an organism to sustain growth, repair, and vital processes and to furnish energy; also : such food together with supplementary substances (as minerals, vitamins, and condiments) I see no indication that a particular item must be \"regular and...nescessary (sic)\" to be considered food and I see no reason why lobster would not meet this definition. Are you saying that lobster does not contain protein, carbohydrate, or fat? Are you saying that it is not digested or utilised by the body?
  • Toffy_VanessaToffy_Vanessa Member Posts: 4,074 ✭✭
    edited 27 February, 2006
    I\'ll have to side with Alex on this one. Food is the general term used to describe what you eat. A treat is an example of something you eat. Therefore a treat is food. Makes sense, doesn\'t it? Of course, treats are no substitute for regular food. You can\'t just eat nothing but treats all the time. If you give treats, do so occasionally and in moderation. Although some may be bad for you, especially if you eat too many of them, there are also more nutritious treats that you can buy or make.
  • Ashley WeatherholtzAshley Weatherholtz WhartonMember Posts: 85
    edited 27 February, 2006
    These are small recipes I make once a week for my kitty, she still has access to her normal kitty kibble as well . . . but I love treating her to some cooked food. Kitty Shrimp Cabobs - 1 small shrimp, coated in a pinch of salt and some extra virgin olive oil just so it doesn't stick to the grill. Scure the shrimp on the cabob, and place on the grill or pan to sear. Wait til each side is a nice golden brown and remove from the pan/grill unscure the shrimp and place on a small platter. Sprinkle with a tiny bit of catnip, or garnish with kitty grass. Oriental Tuna Kitty Suprise - take store bought tuna, slice thinly and coat generously in olive oil. Sear either side lightly in a warm pan, set on a small plate and place a small spoonful of warm white or brown rice at one end. Roll firmly and pinch. Do atleast two of these, as my kitty seems to be able to eat that much and she is tiny. Let them cool and enjoy! Mackrel delight - slice store bought mackrel when in season, you can take one slice a bit thick and coat in olive oil, sear lightly and then turn your pan down low and place a lid on your pan so that it may cook thourougly. Plate and wait for it to cool before cutting small slices from it for your kitty.
  • Toffy_VanessaToffy_Vanessa Member Posts: 4,074 ✭✭
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Those treats sound delicious, Clear Blue Sky! I'm feeling hungry! :-)
  • Lauren DooleyLauren Dooley RichmondMember Posts: 74
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Aww come on guys treats are treats! Treats can be both food and things simply meant as a rare special occasion. They don't always have to be healthy (though should never be poisonus of course), but the non healthy ones obviously should be very rare indeed. Everything in moderation right? And those treats do sound delicious.
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