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Some Food Questions..

Tina HTina H Member Posts: 6,836
edited 11 September, 2010 in Food & Nutrition
Hi guys; I just had a couple of questions running through my mind, and just wanted your opinions on them. -- I read that a kitten between 6 - 16 weeks, needs to be fed 4 times a day. But I've also read that 3 times per day is lots. I am currently feeding Dante 4 times a day. I can feel his ribs, but just barely. Does this mean I'm feeding him too much? (Remember, he's getting a mix of dry & moist kitten food -- until we see the vet on Saturday.) -- If I do decide to switch Dante onto raw foods. Isn't there bacteria in raw meat? I realize that when cats hunt in the wild, they're prey is raw meat. But their prey is also still alive.. So if I go somewhere to buy meat for Dante.. Is it different than eating in the wild? Okay.. I think that's it for now. Thanks guys!

Comments

  • Lisa ProvostLisa Provost Member Posts: 4,486
    edited 9 September, 2010
    4 times a day is fine but so is 3. Either one is good as long as he's eating enough calories for his size. Here's the scoop on raw & bacteria, that dry food has a better chance of spreading salmonella than raw food does if done correctly! Here's some reading to do on that subject: http://ibdkitties.net/Aboutraw.html, then look at the top afterwards and you can see what BK's mom and the Dynacats's mom wrote for a really great and detailed instructional on it!=;
  • Tina HTina H Member Posts: 6,836
    edited 9 September, 2010
    Thanks again for your help Alex.. I\'ve read that article again. I already read it once, but I was reading so much that day. I forgot what it was all about.. :D
  • Lisa ProvostLisa Provost Member Posts: 4,486
    edited 9 September, 2010
    :D No problem! I'm sure I've repeated myself here millions of times already. I also forget who I've given the website address to and for what reason! :))
  • Marie CallinMarie Callin Member Posts: 494
    edited 9 September, 2010
    When I was taking care of LaMoose he was eating four meals a day...for a total of 11 ounces of canned a day::o Just make sure that you don't feed kibble for 12 hours before feeding raw. You don't want the raw to get backed up behind kibble:) So when switching it is easiest (IMO) to feed wet food instead of dry (canned is digested @ about the same speed as raw while kibble is digested much slower). Hope the vet visit goes well!
  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 11 September, 2010
    With kittens, at that age, you pretty much, want to feed them what they will eat, as they are growing little boys and girls.It is important to feed them a quality kitten food, not adult, because kitten food has the higher protein and calories, that young kittens need. But you don't want to free feed them either, as some eat like truck drivers, like, ah the big Bump, who was starting to get overweight at about 10 months. Being overweight is very detremental to their health, can cause a plethera of health issues, and taking weight off is a very long process, and must be done very carefully, to avoid liver issues. Its not how many times you feed them, its what you feed them, the quality and the calorie content. Find a quality food, they like, take the bag or can to the vet, and ask him/her to help you figure out, how much they should be fed, PER DAY, then divy that up into how many feedings you want to do. How many, depends on your schedule. Most work, and do it 3 times a day, before work, after work, before bed. Thats how I started my kittens, when they were little. Now that they are older, they get fed twice a day, same as Bump. And know, this is just a place to start, it may have to be adjusted up or down, depending on the kitten, but as they grow, you will have to increase it, a very little at a time, and again, you have to work with your vet on this, and each kitten is different, just as people are. Really, you should not be able to feel their ribs at all. Has the kitten been wormed? Never use over the counter wormers, and never never use Hartz, do not use any Hartz products, at all. Its best to take the kitten to the vet, and have them do it. Most use Drontal, and believe they can be wormed at 6 weeks, but check with your vet on that. All kittens have worms, its no reflection on the momma kitty or the person, thats just how it is. Kittens can be transistioned to adult food, ballpark 7-8 months. It has to be done very gradually, like over 14 days. Go to Petsmart, and in the cat section, in the magazine rack, there is a magazine called Kittens, its an annual, read thru it, alot of great articles on kitten care. :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
  • Stacia BennettStacia Bennett Athens, GAMember Posts: 1,011
    edited 11 September, 2010
    Your question about raw: Yes, raw meat has bacteria just like everything else in the world ("bacteria" as a general population are not bad things; they do a lot of good for us). The thing about cats (dogs too) is that they are carnivores that were intended to eat meat. In the wild, they would hunt and kill their prey and eat it raw. Their digestive systems are A LOT shorter than ours and generally the food is digested and processed so quickly that there is no time for a bacterial infection to occur (which is why you shouldn't feed raw soon after kibble; since the kibble digests so slowly the raw will get "backed up" in the digestive system and have a lot more time to sit there and potentially make your pet sick. Cats are also a lot less susceptible to food borne illnesses than we as humans are. You could eat a piece of raw chicken and get a horrible case of salmonella from it, while you could feed the same piece to your cat and he more than likely would not be affected. Cat Digestive System Sheep Digestive System Notice that the sheep's small intestine is WAAAAAAAAY longer than the cat's (not just because the sheep is a bigger animal; it makes up a huge percentage of the whole digestive tract of the sheep whereas the cat's makes up a smaller percentage of the whole). Also notice that the large intestine in the sheep is significantly longer than the cat. The large intestine is where things like carbohydrates and starches get broken down. The reason that dry foods aren't really good for cats (other than moisture content) lies in this fact. The cat has a much shorter large intestine for breaking down carbs and starches than an animal that was intended to eat them. Notice too that the cat's stomach makes up a HUGE portion of its digestive tract compared to the sheep's stomach. The stomach of a carnivore contains very strong stomach acid designed to break down meat, so it makes sense that the stomach would be such an important part of the digestive system itself. In short, the carnivore (cat) has a short digestive system for quickly breaking down meat products (which digest much more quickly than plan products, even in humans) and rapidly excreting waste. This is why they can eat raw meat and not get sick. Hope this helps and makes sense.
  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 11 September, 2010
    Hi Maddox :-h Just even thinking, about trying to feed Raw, to Mr I want my Goodlife, and your lucky I even eat BW, mol, gives me a headache, mol. :)) But I still like to learn, about the other sides, so have a quick question, hope it doesn't sound too stupid. Some show kitty people feed their kitties steak, like the very good and expensive stuff. First time I heard a man mention this, thought he was kidding. But other show people do too. But they cook it up first, don't know weather its on the rare side, or well done, never asked. Is what they are doing, considered feeding raw? :-k :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
  • Stacia BennettStacia Bennett Athens, GAMember Posts: 1,011
    edited 11 September, 2010
    Hi Bumpurr! I am definitely by no means even close to being a raw expert lol. Maddox is still on a partial raw/partial canned diet with a little dry snack every now and then. BUT I don't think it would be considered raw if it is cooked, no matter how rare it is. Sometimes people with picky kitties will sear the raw meat on each side for just a few seconds (or microwave for a few seconds) to mainly get the smells going more so that the cat can smell it, which will activate their salivary glands and make them more likely to want to eat. I guess this is still considered raw, but any more cooking than that I don't think so. I do know though that some cats can't handle raw beef (makes them vomit). It is not really known why, but the same cats can usually eat it just fine once cooked so it is thought that there is some enzyme in beef that some cats can't tolerate. These enzymes are destroyed by heat, so cooking fixes that problem. Maybe that is why they do it? Maddox gets steak whenever I am having it (though not the expensive kind; I am a broke college student lol and buy beef chuck flatiron steaks, which in my opinion are just about the best steak on the market but it is also one of the cheapest) but I give it to him completely raw and unseasoned of course.
  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 11 September, 2010
    The only experience I had with raw, per say, was not good, maybe another reason, which I don't try it, and i just can see that being an even bigger major project, trying to get Bumpurr to eat it. Cowboy and Cruiser would prob eat raw, they eat anything, mol, and Cowboy, does not, at all, share his toy mousies, with anybody, not even his brother Cruiser, his real brother. And its only the toy mousies, other toys, he will share gladly, go figure, mol. :)) Ya, these people feed top of the line steak, like fillet mignon kind, altho it is cooked, don't know how they supplement with the vits and minerals, and especially taurine, never asked. :-k Which brings me to another question, mol, if cats in the wild, eat raw, how do they get the vits, minerals and taurine? Or are the big cats, different from our domestic kitties?? And how do people that do feed raw, get the vitamins, minerals and taurine in their kitties? :-k I am not going to feed raw, but I still like to learn stuff, mol. :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
  • Stacia BennettStacia Bennett Athens, GAMember Posts: 1,011
    edited 11 September, 2010
    All of the vitamins and minerals that a cat needs are in the meat, organs, and bones of the meat they are designed to eat. If one feeds an appropriately balanced raw diet (80% muscle meat, 10% bone, 5% liver, 5% secreting organ) then that diet will supply everything the cat needs. This is one reason I have not gone completely raw yet: I have not found a good source for organ meats. Once I find a reliable and inexpensive source, then Maddox will be on a full raw diet. So, wild cats get everything they need from their prey (the ratios I mentioned above are modeled after the amounts that an average prey animal would contain). Domestic cats are genetically and anatomically almost identical to their wild counterparts, the only differences being genes that make them look a little different from each other. Humans are all different shapes and sizes as well, but we are all the same in our dietary requirements. It is the same with cats. Some people do supplement. For example, some cats will not eat bone so they have to have a supplement that makes up for the calcium and other minerals that they would get from eating it. Some people supplement with taurine just to make sure that the cat gets enough, but if you feed the right types of meat then you will supply plenty of taurine as well.
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