Low Protein diet - Cat with CRF - Help !

Jennie GundersonJennie Gunderson Member Posts: 5
edited 7 February, 2011 in Food & Nutrition
Wondering if anyone had any info for me... my cat has been diagnosed with kidney disease, vet insists he go on a low-protein diet. Is there anything retail that will work for this !? Vet Food is too expensive for me. Have read claims that good protein non-grain food will have better effects than low-protein specialty food.. also read an all wet-food diet will work.. I'm in need of some input..

Comments

  • Marie CallinMarie Callin Member Posts: 494
    edited 6 February, 2011
    First off, dry food is an absolute no-no for cats with CRF. Want you want is wet food low in phosphorus - not food that is low in protein. You can also add phosphorus binders to the food. I'd tell you some foods that are low in phosphorus, but pet food companies change their food so often, you really need to email/call them to find it out. Some meds that really helped Milo were Calcitriol and Benezipril (I know I spelled that wrong...but don't remember how to spell it!). CRF Guide is a very helpful site to read through and it has a chart of foods here. Please contact the companies and ask for up-to-date information. Most of the information from the chart was updated Summer 2010 and companies could have easily changed their formula since then.
  • Lisa ProvostLisa Provost Member Posts: 4,486
    edited 6 February, 2011
    Mo is right. The more moisture the better and also that low protein diet is not what cats need. Cats are obligate carnivores that need protein in their diet to sustain and it's the phosphorous, ash and magnesium that needs to be kept low. Try to switch to a wet diet if you can and even add a little water to the food each time. That's really what's going to help. Also, with kidney disease, B12 injections do wonders. Tanya's CRF site even recommends that. Sub q fluids if you get dehydrated. Your vet can show you how to do that at home and also the B12 as well, it's very easy. =;
  • Debra HoffmannDebra Hoffmann RidgewoodMember Posts: 1,174
    edited 6 February, 2011
    And just to add....My Bella has CRF. She gets 'occasional' fluids, which means when she looks dry. Something that was bought up to me: Whats important is that your kitty eats, it stays down, and agrees with them. There is such a large selection of food here and thats great! It definatley gives more choices. But what the vet told me with Bella was that the most important thing was that she was eating and drinking and doing so regularly and well. All the best-Bella gets fluid, and is on a suppliment that she takes twice a day to help her...ask your vet about it. It was expensive, but we feel it's worth it. All the best
  • Jennie GundersonJennie Gunderson Member Posts: 5
    edited 6 February, 2011
    thanks so much for all the help! I am definitely gonna look for the lowest phosphate food and check with my vet about fluids.
  • Marie CallinMarie Callin Member Posts: 494
    edited 6 February, 2011
    Another thing, that helped a lot with Milo, was Slippery Elm Bark. Here is an article on littlebigcat about it. It made his stomach much calmer, thus he was willing to eat more. Sub-q fluids can be easy or hard to give, it depends on the cat, and how much of a wuss they are lol! Milo was horrible, he had to be in a "cat bag" with a pillowcase over his head, or he would try bite me (he also had to be in a litterbox because he would have accidents while I was giving fluids). Rajah, on the other hand, sits on my lap purring when I give him fluids and doesn't even seem to notice it. There are differant methods to giving sub-q fluids - I personally prefered using a large syringe (it is faster) plus, now that I am giving Rajah some fluids, I wouldn't have a place to hang the bag/iv line in the barn. It is easier for the cat, and much more comfortable for them, if the fluids are roughly their body tempeture. There is also a certian type of needles that work much better though I can't remember what they are called. Just to note, Milo did have CRF and battled it for two years before we had to put him to sleep in late August. Rajah does NOT have CRF but has a hard time staying hydrated enough so I give him 35cc of fluids every other night which keeps that under control. Milo didn't eat much of the prescription foods - he ate canned foods that were lower in phosphorus as well as some premade raw.
  • Jennie GundersonJennie Gunderson Member Posts: 5
    edited 7 February, 2011
    I am going to try a few brands of cat foods out there... found on the web a few of the Evo, Wellness & felidae are low in phosphorus so I am going to pick up a few.. he prefers canned to dry & just last nite started throwing up the dry prescription CRF food.. good thing is he stays pretty hydrated..drinks water alot.
  • Lisa ProvostLisa Provost Member Posts: 4,486
    edited 7 February, 2011
    There ya go. Perfect timing to try something else. Those brands are much better for him anyway! Let us know how it goes, good luck. =;
  • Jennie GundersonJennie Gunderson Member Posts: 5
    edited 7 February, 2011
    I went out & bought a few different cans that had lowered ash or phosphorus percentages.. some are hard to tell ! Almost all had a moisture of 78% and an ash under 2%. But I did find one brand that had a higher moisture of 85% and still had a ash of 1.2% which was lower ash than any ! It's Weruva Grain-free - i hope he likes it ! Most all of the protein levels were 9 or 10% ..hopefully focusing in on the ash and phosphorus will work.
  • Lisa ProvostLisa Provost Member Posts: 4,486
    edited 7 February, 2011
    I think it will make a difference and Weruva is a very, very good company. A lot of kitties like that food! Let us know how it goes and do it slowly! Don't go too fast with the diet change, that can cause issues also. =;
  • Diane HooperDiane Hooper Member Posts: 314
    edited 7 February, 2011
    Hi Hugs! :-h I remembered reading something about this in Dr. Hodgkins' book, "Your Cat: Simple Secrets to a Longer, Stronger Life." If your library has it, I really recommend it. She mentions "Another strategy that works well is the addition of chopped, cookedegg white to the patient's wet diet. Egg white is high in top-quality protein but contains no phosphate, so it effectively "dilutes" the phosphorus in the food." She also mentions phosphorus binders. She includes a link to a website that you might find useful: www.felinecrf.com. I took a quick look but didn't see eggs mentioned, but there may be other helpful information there. I hope this helps, and good luck! |:|
Sign In or Register to comment.

Welcome to the new Catster Community!

Introduce the community to your pet with our Pet Profiles and discover how to use the new community with our Getting Started pages!


Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!