Weight, canned, dry, raw, help please?

Dayna HickmanDayna Hickman ChesterMember Posts: 2,149
edited 17 July, 2011 in Food & Nutrition
Okay, so I recently switched all my critters (dogs and Maple) to Taste of the Wild. Maple LOVES the TOTW green can cat food. I've been feeding dry in the am and wet in the evening. It seems to be working well. I also have, since we brought Maple home, fed raw scraps (a tiny piece of chicken breast or deer when I happen to be cooking it) so that she wouldn't turn her nose up if I ever decided to go raw. Well, I've put my pooches on a 25% raw diet, and I will happily do the same for Maple but I don't know where to start. As soon as this bag is gone we will be feeding ALL canned food. But I want them to have some of the huge benefits of raw as well. I can't go ALL raw because, simply, we don't have the freezer space. Soooo. 1. Is TOTW okay for cats? She likes it MUCH better than BB Wilderness (although I may create a rotation). 2. How do I go about feeding the kitty 25% raw? Thanks! I actually bought Maple chicken gizzards, but I'm too scared to feed any yet! Mol! Oh! One more thing, 3. She has gained a LOT of weight in the last couple of months. She's getting a little pudgy and has a HUGE spay pouch. Is this normal for a 1 year old indoor kitty? We do play with her, but she doesn't do a whole lot energy wise, and she ALWAYS begs for "more" food. I'm not sure I know the appropriate amount to feed her, and I do want her to be healthy! :D

Comments

  • BROOKE LOWRYBROOKE LOWRY TampaMember Posts: 6,037
    edited 3 July, 2011
    I'm not exactly sure how you're doing 25% raw with your dogs - so more details on that would be good. In terms of switching your cats over, I'd tackle the switch to all canned food first, and then from there you can move to raw. It might be easier to do half raw and half canned, because cats usually eat two meals a day, so you could do one canned food meal and one raw meal.
  • Paula K-Paula K- New YorkMember Posts: 2,244
    edited 4 July, 2011
    Here are some articles about raw feeding that Dyna Cats' mom and I have written to help people learn more about raw and how to get started: http://www.ibdkitties.net/rawinstructions.html. Even 25% of their diet as raw will have to be balanced, so it's not quite as easy as giving a few gizzards! But gizzards are a great way to clean teeth and build jaw strength if you just want to try them as treats. Good luck and please feel free to come into the raw forum with any questions at all!
  • Jennifer SzucsJennifer Szucs ChathamMember Posts: 3,765
    edited 4 July, 2011
    Well if you are feeding kibble as well you have to make sure that you do not feed the two any less then 12 hours apart from each other as kibble takes alot longer to digest. 8-12 hours and raw only takes about 3. So maybe stick to just canned and Id suggest half and half as it may be easier to balance. I did that for a while before going 100% raw. Worked well.
  • Lisa ProvostLisa Provost Member Posts: 4,486
    edited 4 July, 2011
    I was going to say the same thing about the kibble, be very careful with that. But yes, TOTW is a very good food! Grain free and most kitties do well on it. =; I agree though, get off the kibble completely and onto canned before going all raw.
  • Trisha PoeTrisha Poe Member Posts: 1,169
    edited 4 July, 2011
    Just a few questions please. I have a 12 yr old beeeeuuuutiful kat named Gator, from his picture he looks huge but he is not over wt but the picture is weird, I was shocked when I finally put it on the computer, hence the caption "does this bed make me look fat"? The questions I have are, I am feeding both Gator and my new kitten, Charlotte Pawz totally canned food, but they both seem very hungry all the time. Gator used to be on both kibble and canned but after having a diabetic cat I switched to all canned. I am feeding at least 1-6 oz can to each of them and some raw at bedtime. It just never seems to be enough. I do give kibble (orijen or wellness) as a treat late at night but thats it. I feed Wellness, Merrick, NB and TOTW canned, lots of variety. Geez, I am thinking I am not feeding enough, any thoughts would be greatly appreciated. They both are very energetic, Gator can go out in the enclosed, fenced 1/2 acre back yard, he is on invisible fence and completely fenced in so he is safe, Charlotte is still too little to go out and also too small to go on invisible fence, she will be on invisible fence at about 6 months, they get lots of exercise especially now in the summer. I am tempted to give them some kibble but hate that idea.
  • Trisha PoeTrisha Poe Member Posts: 1,169
    edited 4 July, 2011
    sorry, my post should've been a new post, so sorry.
  • Dawn HarmanDawn Harman SpeedwellMember Posts: 1,079
    edited 5 July, 2011
    Maple, You may want to ask your question on the raw forum, maybe they can give you a good or different answer. It sounds like you are doing good to me though. We all eat mostly dry with some canned here and there. But Meowma gives us all raw when she is cooking. Even the 3 dogs. I tend to catch my own rats and mice from time to time. Started with lizards. Now my Brofur Mac\'s Cat does that. Meowma got a picture of me caring one in my mouth the other night. Best of luck on your endeavors!(^^
  • Paula K-Paula K- New YorkMember Posts: 2,244
    edited 5 July, 2011
    Gator, the number of calories a cat should get per day is based on their ideal weight and their activity level. So if you post your weight someone can help you figure out how many calories you should be getting per day. In my opinion, if the kitten is under 6-9 months she should be eating as much as she wants. Not everyone agrees and you'll have to decide, but if she doesn't gorge herself feed her more. Kittens burn off a LOT of energy and usually need to eat more than adults. Hope this helps.
  • BROOKE LOWRYBROOKE LOWRY TampaMember Posts: 6,037
    edited 6 July, 2011
    Gator, I agree with BK - each cat's age, metabolism, activity level, etc. is going to be different, and therefore, their intake level is going to be necessarily different. As an example, my three cats: Olivia is a 7 year old spayed female. She weighs ten pounds. Tanner is a 5 year old neutered male. He weighs thirteen pounds. Finn is a 1.5 year old neutered male. He weighs ten pounds. Now, I feed raw, but to put it in canned food terms, for their ages and activity levels, Olivia and Tanner would both eat about half of a 5.5 ounce can of canned food twice a day. Finn would eat a whole 5.5 ounce can twice a day, plus snacks. The two older cats are fairly active for housecats - they have an outdoor enclosure that they go out in, they play independently with toys and one another, and I also play with them interactively using feather wands, etc. Tanner I think is at pretty close to an optimum weight. Olivia I would like to see lose about half a pound or so. Finn I'd like to see gain, but honestly I think this is just him - he's always going to be on the smaller, leaner side - his build is different from the other two, he's much smaller in stature as well, not just leaner. This could be as a result of early malnutrition/starvation, or it could just be him. I don't know. Either way, the point is, I have three cats here, two who eat roughly the same amount of food even though there is three pounds difference in their weights and two years difference in their ages, and one who eats double what the other two eat and just burns it off. So - as BK said, the kitten should be eating as much as he wants as often as he wants. The others might need more, if they are underweight or very active, or they might just be beggars who need to continue eating the same rations they're currently getting, if not less. That's something you'll have to judge by their body condition, etc.
  • Dayna HickmanDayna Hickman ChesterMember Posts: 2,149
    edited 13 July, 2011
    Hey Catsters! Maple, too always acts hungry-- although she isn't. She gets fed 1/2 a can of TOTW every night, and a small amount f dry in the evenings. I'm going to switch her to all canned when she finishes the bag (takes forever because I'm splitting it up...). I also feed her raw bits of chicken breast, and sardines packed in water periodically. For the dogs: they get kibble except for 3 evenings a week. MWF are raw nights. So I can give the gizzard as a treat? Like, say, MWF when the pups get raw can I feed Maple raw instead of canned... Maybe give the canned food those mornings and she can get raw those nights? I like that it gives her a variety. But maybe that's because I'm human...
  • Paula K-Paula K- New YorkMember Posts: 2,244
    edited 14 July, 2011
    Maple, I wouldn't feed 3 raw meals a week without balancing it (muscle meat, bones, organs in the right proportions). That said, I would give a gizzard treat after a regular canned meal. (NEVER after a kibble meal.)
  • BROOKE LOWRYBROOKE LOWRY TampaMember Posts: 6,037
    edited 15 July, 2011
    I agree with BK - if you're going to do three meals per week of raw, then they should be balanced meals. However, a snack of raw gizzards after a canned food meal is no problem.
  • Dayna HickmanDayna Hickman ChesterMember Posts: 2,149
    edited 16 July, 2011
    Let me explain a little further: Due to the nutrient content of (I'm talking from the dog side) kibble (or canned for the cat) I was told by MANY Dogsters that if I only fed 25% raw (I was wanting to do 50/50) that I needed to skip organs and too much bone because I would be feeding too many of certain nutrients like calcium. Essentially--the kibble (or wet) covers all the important stuff--and I'm getting some of the benefits of raw (cleaner teeth, more meal options). Remember: I feed 3 of 14 meals raw. That is a little less than 1/5 of their diet. I know things are different in cats--but if I balanced it, would that (once again) be giving her too much? I ask because I know in dogs things like too much calcium can really mess with their bodies, especially in puppies. I just guessed that it can in kitties too.
  • Paula K-Paula K- New YorkMember Posts: 2,244
    edited 17 July, 2011
    Keep in mind that you're only balancing the raw portion, not the total amount they eat. So if you're feeding 10 oz. of raw per week (for example) 8 oz. would be muscle meat, 1 oz. would be bone and then a half oz. each of liver and organ. If you did it like that they wouldn't be getting too much of anything. Personally, I would try to balance that 20% of their total intake. That said, you wouldn't need to be QUITE as exact since they're getting 80% balanced in a can. Just my opinion!
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