Help me quick-I bite to much!

Sara MintonSara Minton ToledoMember Posts: 206
edited 1 November, 2005 in Behavior & Training
Hi, I'm Marie's temp. human sister. I need to find a way to get her to stop biting. My father is a grumpy old man who doesn't like animals and is only keeping her because he is afraid she'll freeze to death in the cold. She bites constantly, I understand she's a kitten and she'll most likely grow out of it. But my father doesn't, if I don't find a way to make this stop or find a home for her, dad says he'll take her to the nearest shelter (a kill shelter is the closest). So far I've been able to talk him out of it (he really doesn't want to see her put down) but it won't be to much longer before he loses his temper and really does drop her off. Her biting isn't from lack of toys, she has tons and refuses to be redirected to chewing/biting them. She constantly attacks our feet, hands, legs, and even our faces if she can reach them. I even resorted to the horrid spray bottle, but that just makes her bite more. Please help, if you know any way to decrease or stop the biting I'd be greatful.

Comments

  • Deb O'NeillDeb O'Neill PerkasieMember Posts: 8,659
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Well, at her age I think she WILL bite or attack anything available. She will grow out of it eventually. Personally, I think your dad needs to mellow! That doesn't help you, I know. The best I can think of is to keep Marie away from your dad when he's home. Put her in a bedroom with food water and litter when dads in the house. Let her roam when he's at work.
  • edited 27 February, 2006
    Most animals who are mistreated and unloved will act like that.
  • Rachel NosalRachel Nosal LincolnMember Posts: 135
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Midnight, please quit passing off such information as fact. It\'s quite unbecoming for such a beautiful lady like yourself. \"Most cats\" do NOT bite because they are mistreated or unloved. This is simply untrue. To truly understand the reasoning behind Marie\'s biting, you must understand a bit about felines in general and their natural predatory aggression. Cats are predators. It is in their instinct to hunt down and kill. Predatory behavior is often characterized by long periods of lying in wait and stalking followed by an explosion of activity - the attack. It\'s common for a cat to creep up to a sleeping owner and playfully attack them in bed. Some cats sit quietly, staring at a wiggling toe, then with lightening speed, they pounce and attack. Other cats lie in wait under furniture until a foot passes by, then their claw reaches out and grabs. Cat play is an extension of their predatory nature. It provides the cat with the opportunity to develop and sharpen its hunting skills, even if it never needs to go out and catch its own dinner. Although your cat may be playing, playful bites can still hurt and cause injury. Predators living in a \"sterile\" (indoors) environment can cause problems. With no real prey to hunt, your cat will still need to express this natural behavior. The result is cats who pretend that people are prey. They play-attack wiggling toes and fingers. They chase imaginary prey up and down the drapes, across table tops and wreck havoc in the process. Furthermore, lonely, bored cats that have an excess of energy and no where for that energy to go. They cannot chase real mice and birds, or climb real trees, so they develop other habits to entertain themselves. This is the obvious cause of Marie\'s biting. Cats who bite due to mistreatment are using it as a defense mechanism. As such, you will note other signs of fear and/or anger, which you haven\'t. These cats will shy away from being touched, hide, may hiss, spit or even lunge. Another possibility, especially in kittens, is over stimulation agression. An often perplexing case history involves a cat that one moment lies peacefully purring on the owner\'s lap, happily accepting affection; and the next moment, erupts into a rage of claws and teeth. The owner is shocked by the sudden attack. It\'s actually normal behavior for cats to have quick reversals of mood and behavior. There\'s a fine line between enjoyable petting and irritating handling. Once the petting reaches a certain threshold, the cat will reject any further touching. The cat says, \"Stop it!\" by biting or scratching. Perhaps a sensitive or painful area was unknowingly touched. Continuous pleasurable stimulation can overexcite the cat causing aggressive behavior. The cat becomes sexually excited and the resulting aggression is a part of normal sexual behavior. The easiest way to control biting is diversion. Find enticing, exciting toys and give your cat the opportunity to hunt, pounce and \"kill\" these things. Pet stores are filled with toys that move, roll and bounce erratically for your cats entertainment. Toys attached to the end of wands, wires, and string can be waved, dragged and waggled in front of kitty. All these toys and games are supposed to simulate moving prey and stimulate your cat\'s predatory nature. Take time to play these games with your cat and your cat will also be less likely to pounce on and bite you in play. An exercised, contented cat will be less likely to go into a wild frenzy of phantom prey chasing in the middle of the night. Please remember to never physically scold a cat for biting, this is simply their natural instinct. Physically scolding will be seen as a challenge, which we felines love and we will come back for more. You may feel free to hiss or say \"OUCH!\" in a loud voice to get their attention, then simply remove them from you.
  • Sara MintonSara Minton ToledoMember Posts: 206
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Sophie, Bandit thanks again, you two seem to know your stuff. Oh, just FYI I caught my dad on the floor playing with her today. It was funny to see a man in his condition on the floor pulling a toy mouse around for this little bundle of fur. I don\'t think it helped his hernea any, but he was actually laughing and having fun. It wasn\'t fun getting him back up when he was done, but he said she actually isn\'t that horrible of a creature \"when you get to know her\". Plus he was a little upset when I told him I\'ve got a couple somewhat interested in adopting her. They don\'t sound very serious about it so I think they\'re going to back out, but he seemed reluctant to let her go. Well who knows what the future will hold, eh?
  • Amanda BeckmanAmanda Beckman SpelterMember Posts: 11
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Mmm...I bite everything and everyone, but I'm just playing. I love attacking feet, especially when Mommy's making the bed and I am under it! We kittens are very playful and what can we do aside from nipping and clawing? I also bite/nibble when I am in a lovable mood. I go for Mommy's nose and she flicks me on MY nose and says "No!" and then she won't pet me unless I don't nibble her. It's very frustrating, but I think I'm learning that she doesn't like to have her nose nibbled. Good luck!
  • Deb O'NeillDeb O'Neill PerkasieMember Posts: 8,659
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Marie, Dad was playing with you? Sounds like he might want to keep you around after all! You are such a cute kittie, I hope everything works out well for you! Take care!
  • Sara MintonSara Minton ToledoMember Posts: 206
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Well dad did decide to keep her, she didn't impress the couple who was interested (I thought they would back out). The biting gets less and less every time dad plays with her. I think the added activity and her growing up helps. Thanks for all the great advice everyone. Both Marie and dad seem happy with the situation as it stands.
  • edited 27 February, 2006
    Hi I used to bite a lot when I was a baby too manly cause my mouth hurt so bad with my teeth coming in. What my mom did is everytime I would bite she would grab my muzzle(very gently) and hold my mouth shut. Goodness how I hated that she would hold my mouth shut for about 30 seconds. If I wouldn't let her get me that way she would hold my bottom jaw which was even worse cause I couldn't close my mouth no matter how I tried. It didn't take me very long to learn not to bite. Oh and something else.....sometimes when I would bite I would get wet all of a sudden....I still don't know what that's all about.....after all mom isn't made of water.
  • edited 27 February, 2006
    Hi I'm Miracles' uncle Peanut. I used to bite like crazy before mom and dad got me. Mostly because I was trying to play but was only taught how to play really rough but it was also partly because of the way I was treated. Mom did the same thing to me that she did to Miracle and now I only bite if dad is rough houseing with me. Mom can even clip my nails now and all I do is growl a bit no more trying to bite and clawing. Oh and by the way Miracle you get wet because of the spray bottle(you can never tell where humans put those things). That might help with your biting problems too Marie. Good Luck!!!!
  • Fabiana BoimanFabiana Boiman São PauloMember Posts: 1
    edited 27 February, 2006
    Very useful information, pals! Thank you for sharing! Snarf bites me a lot when he's bored. He provokes me biting my arms and it really hurts until I stand up and go run after him (and then he got what he wanted). I tried everything, but he's very wilful sometimes. He also bites me when I pet him in moments he don't want to be, but it's normal, he's just telling me to stop doing it (but he's so cute I can't stop. :-D lol). He's almost one year old. I'm thinking about adopting another kitten to play with him. I think he will like to have a sister (I hope so) and then probably he will bite me less than usual.
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