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When should kitten be able to eliminate on his own?

Hello. Last week we took in a small kitten my coworker found in her driveway. We are not sure about the age - his eyes are open, he has cut a few teeth and his ears are starting to stand up. He also is toddling around pretty well, but he's no where near old enough to be seperated from mommy under normal circumstances. We know he's had a lot to deal with, because he had two abcesses (one on his neck, one on his shoulder) from where our vet thinks a tom cat tried to kill him to put the mother back in heat - he suspects that's how kitty got seperated from its mom. But the kitten has been thriving - he has gained weight and is always eager to bottle feed. We are feeding KMR. The problem is, he still is not pottying on his own. He has no trouble going when we stimulate him; pee and poo are the right colors. All the articles I've read on development says they potty by three weeks, but I suspect he's at least that old. Our vet says he will eventually grow into it. When should I be concerned?

Best Answers

  • Diane LangDiane Lang Member Posts: 70
    Accepted Answer
    We have had to raise four kittens the same way you are. They kind of get the idea to go on their own at their own pace. Some ideas you might try. Using a cotton ball to stimulate the kitten put the used cotton ball with urine on it in a very shallow pan with litter. Please make sure it isnt the clumping litter which is very bad for a kittens health. Put the kitten in the litter a few times a day and eventually she will get the idea. I wouldnt be concerned for quite a while
  • Tiffany schweiglTiffany schweigl Green Bay WIMember Posts: 5
    Accepted Answer
    dont be concerened the kitten is still little.
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