I have a cat that I have had for over 12 years he is an 18.5 pound neutered male what health problem

NO DETAILS OTHER THAN CAT IS GETTING OLDER JUST WANT TO KNOW WHAT TO LOOK FOR AS FAR AS HEALTH CONDITIONS HE IS AN 18.5 POUND NEUTERED CAT THAT I HAVE HAD FOR OVER 12 YRS.

Best Answers

  • Michelle MayoMichelle Mayo New LiakeardMember Posts: 276
    Accepted Answer
    The number one thing to look for is any behaviour that is not normal for Tigger. If he starts acting oddly, or you think something may be wrong then take him to a vet. A vet will also be able to tell you if he is healthy and help make sure he stays that way.
  • Lisa DaversLisa Davers SacramentoMember Posts: 3,642
    Accepted Answer
    An annual blood test and check up at the vets is a really good idea to make sure everything is going OK. Between his annual physicals you should check his weight regularly and watch for any behavior changes like yowling, eating more/less than normal, tiredness etc. If you have a set of baby scales they are best as they weigh to the ounce rather than the pound and you'll spot weight loss quicker. This can all help catch things like hyperthyroidism, kidney issues, bad teeth etc early before Tigger shows any real symptoms and makes treatment easier. Tigger still looks in good shape but in the future he may get arthritis and have problems jumping or be stiff when he gets up, especially if its cold/damp in the winter. Also I just invited Tigger to a group called Olde Furts that is for senior cats over 10 years old. Its a nice fun group where you can ask any more detailed questions if you think Tigger is acting strange or seems a bit down.
  • kathy loftkathy loft BellevilleMember Posts: 2,200
    Accepted Answer
    I think regular vet checkups are very important, especially in the senior stage. Instead of once a year, every 6 months may work better for your little guy. A urine and fecal sample would ensure all is working properly. Like previous poster mentioned any change in behaviour or routine is possibly a good sign something might be going on with him. Animals have a great way of hiding pain, so it is up to us to notice any changes in appetite, litter box use or their daily activities. A early diagnosis could possibly stop something from becoming a serious problem or it can be managed with medication. A good body massage nightly to check for lumps and bumps is also a good routine for you to get into. Senior cats will also groom less often, so brushing and cleaning may fall on you if he seems to be lacking in doing this. Like people he may develop arthritis, senility, hearing loss, eye changes and dental disease. Call your vet if you have any concerns or questions. All my best.
  • Cady CalamityCady Calamity Member Posts: 214
    Accepted Answer
    The main thing I watch for with my 15 year old Emily is her eyes. If they seem dull, or she suddenly becomes less responsive (a little over time is normal, sudden is not), then I know that something is wrong. Her mother just died last year, and the biggest symptom that developed right before her death was that she suddenly became less alert, her eyes seemed dull when you looked into them (Sort of a light's on but nobody's there situation), and she stopped responding to her name. So long as there are no sudden changes in environment or attitude, your Tigger should have a few years yet. Relish them. PS. My sister's cat is named Tigger too! They look so similar!
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