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Does anyone eat ALL wet food?

Sharon BraatenSharon Braaten Great BarringtonMember Posts: 842
edited 8 December, 2007 in Food & Nutrition
Here\'s the thing . . . I am kind of chubby. I also suffer from crystals in my urine (which seems to be under control now). The vet prescribed Purina UR dry food, but mom thinks it seems like kitty junk food. Mom has done lots of research and it seems the best diet is all wet (canned) food. It has more moisture and more protein to help keep me hydrated and lose weight. The problem is, I am a dry food addict. My fur siblings, Matilda & Yoda LOVE the wet food, but when mom feeds us, I usually turn my nose up and walk away, or just bury my dish. Mom has been persistent though, in trying to get me to like the wet food. She has been putting some crunchy dry food on top of it, or mixing in some tuna fish, which I like. I just wanted to get some other opinions out there. I am hoping mom doesn\'t take away my dry food for good, because when I run out I WILL bite her ankles! :)) Do most people do a combination of the two? What do you think is best? Any input is greatly appreciated! |^|

Comments

  • Karen LeeKaren Lee The kingdom of Mer-lotMember Posts: 89,020
    edited 16 November, 2007
    I only eat canned food. Of course, I also have diabetes and canned food is much better for me. Canned food is also good for nornal healthy cats :) Maybe you don't like the current brand of canned food. Try a few different ones and different flavors, too. There are tips on to to transition to canned food here: Tips It might take awhile for you to recognize canned food as food.If you need the few pieces of dry food on top of the canned food, that's ok. A few pieces won't hurt you. Maybe you can try healthy crunchy treats instead of the dry food.
  • Sharon BraatenSharon Braaten Great BarringtonMember Posts: 842
    edited 16 November, 2007
    Thanks Merlin. Your post in another forum about wet food really got mom interested in an all wet diet. She was looking at those pictures of obese cats and pictured me turning into that! She has bought many different brands and flavors. She is a cat food snob and only buys the really good stuff. She jokes about how she spends more on us kitty children than she does on herself! MOL. I seem to like California Naturals, sometimes. I don't seem to have any rhyme or reason to when I like certain flavors on certain days. She also tried Wellness, which I didn't like (but my fur siblings LOVE) and Merrick which I eat once in a while. She has about 15 cans that she is trying out on me over the next few weeks. We will see how it goes, although I really miss that full bowl of kibble! I have been whining all week! :-/
  • Shelley CoxShelley Cox CarbondaleMember Posts: 2,752
    edited 16 November, 2007
    It's Stella. I will only eat dry food and the cheaper the better. I'm currently snubbing Eukanuba Sensitive Stomach formula in favor of Iams but I really want the Friskies my person feeds the strays! Delyte is supposed to be eating only wet food, but he steals my dry, so the reality varies. He also has numerous problems and would be better off with canned food and cooked meat. Like me, he seems to refuse the good stuff and hold out for the cheap stuff--or cooked chicken or shrimp. My person is just so glad that he is eating and pooping and happy that she will give him just about anything.
  • Amy BAmy B KershawMember Posts: 3,254
    edited 17 November, 2007
    I'm on an all wet food diet. I only have a few teeth so I'm not left with a lot of choice. ^~~^ Mama would prefer to have me on dry because of the digestive issues (I'm old too... purrr) but there's no option for me. I eat 9 Lives and love the beef! I've never had a weight problem... unless you count not enough... mama wanted a big happy kitty and got a 6 pound kitty-500 competitor. Meow! ~Taillee
  • Annalisa Conserti-JonesAnnalisa Conserti-Jones Member Posts: 5,234
    edited 17 November, 2007
    If you go all wet, make sure you start brushing your teeth all the time. My vet said the more wet food you have per day, the more the chances you will need dental care.
  • Sharon BraatenSharon Braaten Great BarringtonMember Posts: 842
    edited 17 November, 2007
    Mom would love to brush my teeth, but despite my cute appearance, I am actually a very difficult kitty! MOL :)) Mom can barely brush my fur, let alone my teeth. Mom has read so much online it is hard to know who is right. I am getting a little better about eating the canned stuff, but mom is still giving in and feeding me a handful of dry every day. I get really upset when she doesn't give it to me exactly when I want it! I nibble on her and dad and meow like crazy. Then I start climbing the walls! My sister Matilda is old like you Talliee . . . She has very few teeth too but she has always loved wet food. She just wants to eat everything in sight! Thanks for the help everyone! :h:
  • JessicaJessica Long Island, New YorkMember Posts: 1,339 ✭✭✭
    edited 17 November, 2007
    We only eat canned food. Canned food has the nutrients and proteins we kitties need. Dry food has a lot of filler and grain and carbohydrates and fattening things that we dont really need to eat. It's been said that eating only dry makes cats more prone to diabetes and kidney disease and stuff , and cats aren't usually the best water drinkers. It's good to look at the label of whatever canned food you buy to make sure the first ingredient is real meat, and there aren't any yucky fillers like glutens and by products.
  • Jacqueline GonzalvesJacqueline Gonzalves AtwaterMember Posts: 13,637
    edited 17 November, 2007
    I have heard good and bad about canned cat food. I have heard (and I'm trying to find the article) that canned cat food can hurry the onset of high thyroid. I know we feed dry, because once you go wet, it is so hard to get us to eat anything else. Baby Cat, because she is older with not-so-good teeth, gets canned. :(
  • Jacqueline GonzalvesJacqueline Gonzalves AtwaterMember Posts: 13,637
    edited 17 November, 2007
    Found it!! Hyperthyroidism. There is evidence that hyperthyroidism in cats may be related to diet. This is a relatively new disease that first surfaced in the 1970s. Some experts theorize that excess iodine in commercial cat food is a factor. New research also points to a link between the disease and pop-top cans, and flavors including fish or “giblets.” This is a serious disease, and treatment is expensive. IT was on this website: Cat Food Facts Seems like there is a lot about the good of canned, too!=;
  • Sharon BraatenSharon Braaten Great BarringtonMember Posts: 842
    edited 17 November, 2007
    That is very interesting Wally B. Thanks for the info. My fur sister Matilda has hyperthyroidism and chronic kidney failure. She is almost 19 years old. Mom got her when she was 12, so she doesn't know what she ate before then. Mom has fed her mostly high quality dry food with a little bit of canned food every day, so she is not sure if diet played a part in her illness, or if it is just old age. She is doing very well on her meds and drinking lots of water. She is crazy about all the wet food she is getting lately.
  • Jacqueline GonzalvesJacqueline Gonzalves AtwaterMember Posts: 13,637
    edited 17 November, 2007
    This is an article I thought someone may be intersted in: That Hungry Old Cat by Dr. Jon Klingborg, DVM Changes in a cat’s eating habits may be your only warning that he has a serious health problem. Just like us, most cats will lose their appetites when they are sick. An older cat that is eating less could by trying to tell you that he has a serious problem like dental, liver, or kidney disease. If your cat isn’t eating like he used to, then he should definitely receive a thorough physical exam. However, some cats will actually start to EAT MORE when they are sick! The two most likely causes of an increased appetite in older cats are diabetes and an overactive thyroid gland. This week, we’re going to talk about an overactive thyroid gland—referred to as hyperthyroidism. Think of the thyroid gland as the boss at the factory. The thyroid gland tells all parts of the body how hard they should be working. If the thyroid gland is hyperactive, then it keeps sending the message “work harder, work faster.” The result of an overactive thyroid gland is that the cat’s metabolism can double or triple. A hyperthyroid cat cannot eat enough to feed his high metabolism, and he starts to lose weight. Sounds like a great diet, right? Not really! As the metabolism increases, the heart has to beat faster, the blood pressure will rise, and all of the internal organs are pushed to their limits. When the thyroid gland is overactive, hungry old cats start to lose a considerable amount of weight over a short period of time (a few months.) Inside, their heart muscle may thicken because the heart is working too hard, the kidneys may start to fail, and increased blood pressure may actually cause sudden blindness. Hyperthyroidism is fairly common in older cats—any cat above ten years of age is at increased risk. Recently, a link between canned cat food and an overactive thyroid gland was discovered. It appears that eating canned cat food as the primary diet will increase the risk of developing hyperthyroidism by five times! Even if a cat’s diet is 50 percent canned food, the risk is still increased by 3.5 times. (There may be a chemical in the cans that causes this.) Other research implicates some flame retardants chemicals that end up in water, fish, house dust (and everything in between!) Hyperthyroidism is treated in three different ways: medicine, surgery, or radiation therapy. The medication usually needs to be given twice a day for the rest of your cat’s life. It works by ‘poisoning’ the thyroid gland into normal function and has few side effects. Medication is a practical and cost effective option for most cat owners. Surgery to remove the overactive thyroid gland is tricky and does have a high complication rate. For that reason, radiation therapy has become a more popular treatment. The cost of radiation therapy is about the same as surgery (around $1500) and is 98% effective at curing hyperthyroidism after one treatment. In other words, cats that are treated with radiation don’t need to take medication—because they’re cured! If you’ve noticed that your older cat has an excellent appetite but is still becoming skinny, then it is time to get him looked at by a veterinarian. With a physical exam and some blood work, the doctor can tell if your cat has an overactive thyroid gland and whether this is affecting the kidneys or the liver. Diagnosing complications such as increased blood pressure and thickened heart muscle is a little more challenging in older cats, and the physical exam will determine if it is necessary to run those additional tests.
  • Jacqueline GonzalvesJacqueline Gonzalves AtwaterMember Posts: 13,637
    edited 17 November, 2007
    Wow, Leaf!! That is amazing! I think whatever your Mommy is doing, must be working!=D>=D>=D>
  • JessicaJessica Long Island, New YorkMember Posts: 1,339 ✭✭✭
    edited 17 November, 2007
    My meowmy read an article where chemicals in certain household items are the culprits behind feline hyperthyroidism. Was in a well known newspaper too. Can't always believe everything you read, mol. To us, the benefits of canned outweighs any problems it may cause.
  • Sharon BraatenSharon Braaten Great BarringtonMember Posts: 842
    edited 19 November, 2007
    Wow Wally B. I just read that whole web page that you put up about pet food facts. I knew things were bad, but I didn't know they were THAT bad! Gross! Now i really don't want to eat dry food! I am getting better about eating the wet food now. I am starting to get used to it. Mom has also done some reading about the model prey diet, where we eat food that is most like our natural diet of raw meat on bones. It is supposed to be good for our teeth and make us very happy to eat like the wild animals we are! Mom & Dad are vegetarians though, so they are really going to think about trying this. |^|
  • Beth BiglerBeth Bigler Member Posts: 42
    edited 19 November, 2007
    I sometimes eat canned food cause it's easier to digest than....."stale food".....Usually, canned foods (for cats) are meats such as tuna, salmon, etc. To me, it's a bit healthier.;c;
  • Eve GonzalezEve Gonzalez Member Posts: 19
    edited 19 November, 2007
    This is such a timely post for me. I\'ve been having urinary issues and the more I read the more I know wet food is the way to go. However, I\'m going all the way and I\'m going to start eating a natural food diet. We got a book by Dr. Pitcairns, it\'s quite famous, and the information in it is so good. I am totally convinced. Now, as far as picky eaters and especially kitties experiencing health issues, it recommends a broth fast for a couple of days. I\'ve done some research on this and apparently it is very healthy. A cats normal eating cycle is actually every 28 hours! It\'s got great recipes and if anyone is interested in trying this I can give you all the info so you don\'t have to buy the book right away. The fast helps clean the bladder and helps motivate eating something new once it\'s over. Everything in this book makes perfect sense. I highly recommend it. Mom\'s words: I put Chloe on the fast for two days and she did great. She actually seemed like she had more energy. I tried giving her the new food the second day and she stuck her nose up so I continued just giving her the broth. Today she\'s eating the food and it\'s so much better for her. I\'m going to give it a week and test her urine again to see if it\'s improved. I\'ll let you know...
  • Sharon BraatenSharon Braaten Great BarringtonMember Posts: 842
    edited 19 November, 2007
    Thanks for your post Chloe. I would love to know more about this book. What kind of broth did you use? Did you like to eat the broth right away? I am super finicky and sometimes I will eat a little wet food and sometimes I will not even touch it. Mom has tried putting treat in it, putting my favorite dry food mixed in, and there is no method to my madness! Sometimes I like it and sometimes I don't! I like to keep mom guessing :-$ Feel free to pawmail me!
  • Ramona NRamona N Member Posts: 27
    edited 20 November, 2007
    Autumn also prefers dry food to canned even though I only give it to her as a treat. I think wet only diet is much better than dry only as dry fopd is.. well, imagine the goods in food which spent last six months on the shelf.. :?
  • Ramona NRamona N Member Posts: 27
    edited 20 November, 2007
    Autumn also prefers dry food to canned even though I only give it to her as a treat (that's what I'd suggest for you to do too). I think wet only diet is much better than dry only as dry fopd is.. well, imagine the goods in food which spent last six months on the shelf.. :?
  • Sharon BraatenSharon Braaten Great BarringtonMember Posts: 842
    edited 20 November, 2007
    You're right Autumn . . . first of all dry food is cooked at high temperatures, which kills many nutrients and healthy enzymes in the food. Then it has to have added preservatives so it can withstand shipping and sitting on the shelf in the store, and finally sitting at your house. Canning is a natural way to preserve food, so there is less added junk to keep canned food fresh.
  • Donna C-Donna C- FairbornMember Posts: 8
    edited 21 November, 2007
    I too am having the same problem. I give my cat 1 canned food a day and then she can have all the hard food that she wants. But believe it or not if she does not have the option for herself she refuses to eat any of it except for maybe a bite or two. I'm trying to put down a canned food and at the sametime trying to set out some dry food then I'll go back and check on her food and notice that more dry food is gone then the canned food. However, after the hard food is gone I'll notice a bite or two of the canned food is gone. Every once in a great while all of her canned food will be gone, but she has to have that option. I guess she's picky. :-/
  • Sharon BraatenSharon Braaten Great BarringtonMember Posts: 842
    edited 21 November, 2007
    This sounds gross, but mom says my poo smells better since I eat less dry food! I was notorious for super stinkies before . . . :r
  • Donna C-Donna C- FairbornMember Posts: 8
    edited 28 November, 2007
    Leaf, This is Donna or Mewona as Secret would say. What is the best way to get her just on a wet food diet? As I mentioned in an earlier post if she does not have an option of wet and dry food she refuses to eat anything. I've never heard of dry food giving a kitty the stinkies before. I however, sometimes do notice a fowl odor after she uses the little kitties room. Come to think of it the time before last I took Secret to the vet because it was a very bad ungodly smell and the vet told us that she had a urinary trech infection. She's over it now though.%:D% Thanks, Donna and Secret
  • Karen LeeKaren Lee The kingdom of Mer-lotMember Posts: 89,020
    edited 28 November, 2007
  • Lucybelle GLucybelle G Member Posts: 96
    edited 29 November, 2007
    Lucy Belle eats canned food and I have a feeding schedule. She eats a combo of canned food, rotated daily. I feed her three to four times a day, depending on how much she wanted to eat and her activity level for that day. I also have a bowl of dry food combo to be fed free choice, but she only munches on it occasionally. Once, I missed her feeding schedule and she started eating dry food alone and little smart kitty did something surprising. Maybe she is not used to eating dry food for a meal, so she drank water and nibble on dry food, drink again, nibble, and so on until she is done. I'd say that's a very creative kitty!
  • Moxie PopMoxie Pop Los AngelesMember Posts: 130
    edited 29 November, 2007
    Regarding hyperthyroidism and canned food: I had a cat that suffered from kidney failure and hyperthyroidism at age 13. She enter my household when she was 12. She and her sister ate ONLY dry food, NO canned food at all. There\'s an estimate that 2% of cats over 10 will develop hyperthyroidism. Although there is a study that says there may be a link to canned food -- I had read about it on avmajournals.avma.org -- MOST research attributes it to environmental causes (e.g. PBDEs, flame-retardant in carpets, furniture, etc). The rise in hyperthyroidism coincides with the use of many environmental toxins and blood tests have shown their presence. SO, we should not be alarmed about feeding canned food because of hyperthyroidism. The benefits of feeding wet food FAR outweigh any potential downside if you read all the research explaining why wet food should be a part of your kitties\' diet. For full disclosure, we are a half dry (Innova Evo, Nutro) and half wet (Innova Evo, Wellness, Nutro) kitty food household but are trying to move to a higher percentage of wet food! :D
  • Barbara WinslowBarbara Winslow BradfordMember Posts: 6
    edited 2 December, 2007
    A mostly canned diet (provided it is good quality food) seems to be the way to go. It\'s what I feed Bella, and she is healthy and thriving. If you\'re worried about dental care, feed your kitty Greenies or some other healthy, between meal snack. The crunch will keep the teeth clean and breath fresh. =D>
  • Moxie PopMoxie Pop Los AngelesMember Posts: 130
    edited 8 December, 2007
    I get Greenies for dental care (along with brushing) and love 'em!
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