Food/Feeding Guidelines from Breeder?

Elizabeth KElizabeth K ChicagoMember Posts: 11,036
edited 31 March, 2008 in Food & Nutrition
This is information that my kitten's breeder sent me, as "Feeding and Care Info". I was curious what other people think of these guidelines, so please let me know what you think! I was surprised at how insistent they were about never feeding canned food? Note: I removed the name of the breeder where it appears, and put "Breeder" in its place. Here it is: (pasted section begins here) ***************************************** Food The most important part of having a healthy, happy, long-lived and big Maine Coon is feeding them the right food. Breeder strongly recommends, to the point of insistence, that you feed your kitten Royal Canin Feline Nutrition-Kitten 34. It is what all our babies are fed, as well as nursing Moms. Feed the Feline Nutrition-Kitten 34 until the babies are at least 12 months old. Beginning at 12 months old, switch your kitten to Royal Canin Maine Coon 31, a food specifically formulated for Maine Coons. It has a bigger bite which forces them to chew. This is an aid to their digestive systems, their teeth and Maine Coon 31 provides all of the many nutrients your kitten needs to grow into a big, beautiful, healthy adult. You may actually begin putting down some Maine Coon 31 when your kitten gets to be about 6 months old, but leave the Feline Nutrition-Kitten down for him as well. We actually leave both foods down for our gang, even as adults, since a little variety in their diets is a good thing and with Royal Canin, they are getting the absolute best food they can be fed. Trust us on this. Royal Canin is not cheap, but again, you are adopting a pure-bred, CFA registered Maine Coon that has cost you good money. If you get your kitten home and you feed something different than the Royal Canin Feline Nutrition-Kitten 34, your kitten may not eat. Or, if he/she does, the kitten may develop diarrhea and become lethargic. Instant food changes will do this. Again, please trust us on this, feed your kitten the best there is. You have spent good money on a Maine Coon, so please do not scrimp on what you feed. Treats Your kitten can have little bites of ham as a treat. Other great treat foods are turkey breast, white meat chicken and of course, tuna, but do not overdo the tuna. No more than once a week and a small amount. Make sure it is water-packed and be sure to break up the larger pieces for your kitten. They especially love the water the tuna is packed in so instead of sending it down the drain, drain your tuna can on a saucer for your Cooner as a treat. Turkey, chicken and ham, or any other kinds of treats, should be cut up into kitten sized bites, even when your Cooner is an adult. Don’t ever give them a big piece and expect them to tear off small chunks. They cannot do that safely. They need to have it cut up for them in small, chewable pieces. Never, ever feed hard or large pieces of treats. Under no circumstances should you let your Cooner get into pretzels, for instance. They could become lodged in your kittens’ throat. We use Fancy Feast Gold as periodic treats for our babies and adults. Fancy Feast Gold is a fairly high quality cat food, not really treats, but since Coons can’t read they think they are getting treats when you give it to them. We’d rather see you use FF Gold as treats than some high-costing, full of fat items advertised as treats. Your kitten will expect treats first thing in the morning and again before bedtime, often while they are sitting on your bed at those times. Be advised….that’s how they were raised. Sorry about that! DO NOT EVER FEED YOUR KITTEN OR YOUR ADULTS WET OR CANNED CAT FOOD, NO MATTER WHAT BREED THEY ARE! IF YOU MISSED THAT PART, WE’LL SAY IT AGAIN….DO NOT EVER FEED YOUR KITTEN OR ADULTS WET OR CANNED CAT FOOD. IF YOUR EXISTING CATS ARE EATING CANNED FOOD, DO YOURSELVES, BUT ESPECIALLY YOUR CATS AND KITTENS, A FAVOR: STOP! There is way too much fat and by-products in canned cat food. It will make their poop smell nuclear and they will get lethargic after eating it. Plus, you never, ever really know what is in canned food and that is a key to be aware of. Feed nothing but Royal Canin foods, as described above, and you will be doing right by your new family member and your existing cats too. If you have existing cats in your home when your little one arrives, they will be fine eating the Royal Canin Feline Nutrition-Kitten 34. You will likely find they will get right into it and eat as if they are starving. Different breed cats can eat what your kitten eats and they can also eat the Maine Coon 31 when your kitten is old enough to handle it. Your other cats will do well and, believe it when we tell you; they will thrive on Royal Canin. Great food is great food and its fine for your existing cats to eat. Did we mention to never, ever feed your cat or kitten canned or wet cat food? We did? OK, good.... ********************************************* (end of pasted section)

Comments

  • Beastie_and_the_BoysBeastie_and_the_Boys Marquette, MI / ChicagoMember Posts: 17,806 ✭✭✭
    edited 29 February, 2008
    Makes me wonder if they're getting kickbacks from Royal Canin. :-# RC may be a decent brand, but they're not the only one. Obviously, any dietary changes should be made gradually to avoid digestive upset, but that doesn't mean you can't change them at all. When we were growing up, my sis and I ate mostly dry food. We'd get wet food maybe once or twice a week as a treat. But as we've gotten older, our vet recommended that we get wet food every day. I'll take the advice of a vet over a breeder any day! Their claim about fat, by-products and "you never, ever really know what" being in canned food is silly. Fat and by-products vary by brand and formula, and if you read the labels, you should be able to determine which ones have more, less, or none. As far as the "you never really know" ingredients--this can just as easily be true for dry food as for wet. So again, reading the labels helps. I guess the best thing to do is start a kitty off on what they're used to, and once you've done your research and talked to your vet, decide what YOU think is best for them. Then, if you decide to change their diet, do it gradually. Good luck! And welcome, Roxy!! :D
  • Annalisa Conserti-JonesAnnalisa Conserti-Jones Member Posts: 5,234
    edited 29 February, 2008
    I'm with Arthur. RC is not by any means the best food there is out there, so if you want to switch your cat to a better brand, you should. I would not recommend trading down, though, because that's when your kitten might refuse food: s/he'd know it's garbage. Regardless of what you decide to do (stick with RC, or transition your kitten to a better brand), the switch between kitten and adult food should be gradual, and you should make it right before your cat reaches its adult weight. Some breeders/vets say 12 months is best, but you have to go by the individual cat's own growth pattern. Leaving out both kinds of food (adult and kitten) seems ridiculous to me and wasteful, not to mention the perfect recipe to create an overeater kitty. A better way to transition is to blend the two. Start out with 1/4 portion of adult, and 3/4 portion of kitten. The next day, put down 1/2 and 1/2, and the next 3/4 and 1/4. Assuming your kitten does not have any issues with the adult formula (picks out the other kibble and refuses the adult ones, has diarrea or gas, throws up), on the 4th day you just feed adult food. That way, the switch is gradual (this, btw, is also a good schedule if you are transitioning from one brand to another), but your cat does not get any extra food for the day. Some breeders/vets say that wet food is a bad recipe for cats because it can cause cavities and is hard to clean. But you can feed wet food in moderation, or brush your cat's teeth if feeding daily. If feeding wet food, I'd recommend feeding one of the better brands, because stuff like Friskies and Iams just isn't very healthy for any cat. Lastly, it is a myth that larger kibbles will force your cat to chew. Sure, the idea behind it is sound: if cats were to chew their food, this would keep cleaning their teeth. But cats do not chew in a natural habitat, they rend and swallow. So with dry food, they think "Ok, it's already broken up so now I just swallow it". So one of two things might happen when you switch to adult food with big kibbles: the cat swallows it whole anyway, or it turns up their nose at food that just isn't small enough for their taste (I do this with my greenies: they are twice the size of my kibble, so I step on them to crush them with my paws, and eat the bits one by one; if I can't break it by myself, I don't eat them at all).
  • Robin PinkhamRobin Pinkham BangorMember Posts: 1,601
    edited 1 March, 2008
    Hi Roxy, I think most breeders feed what they feel is best for their cattery and in your case they feel so firmly they are doing what is right they want their kitten\'s new parents to continue their regimen. I have seen the Royal canin Maine coon cat food discussed on some Maine Coon lists, and just like any food , some folks love it, while some don\'t like it at all...It is a novel idea to have a breed specific food, and really a great marketing tool. Like all pet owners of course you need to decide what is best for your cats. Feed what you , with your vets input, feel is best for your cat. You may find you like the Royal Canin, or you may prefer another food. If or when you decide to change be sure to do it gradually. As far as wet food goes, personally I have always fed that to my cats ( as well as dry ) . Everyone has their own opinion, which I respect, my understanding though is that wet food is very good for cats, with its higher mositure content. I have read that some folks feel almost any canned food is better than dry... not sure on that , but good canned tends to list meat as 1st ingredient while dry is often some type of \"meal\". My own cats do well eating both canned and dry, but families here will say they have dry only eaters who live long healthy lives, canned only eaters living long healthy lives and eaters of both living long healthy lives.... As far as treats go- It\'s strange for the breeder to suggest ham as a treat. Although I do admit I give my cats a tidbit of ham now and then, I know it is really not good for them due to the salt etc.... The breeder of Loki and Maggie feed them a blend of dry foods as well as canned before we got them , She provided us some food to mix into what we would feed for a gradual change. The one thing she said was that we should not feed fish cat food to them.... a personal preference of hers:? Anyway,Maggie and Loki have grown into nice big wonderful healthy cats So, check labels and feed what you feel is right - and what Roxy will eat of course- and I\'m sure Roxy will thrive.=; By the way, its kind of odd how that breeder calls them cooners- Its not a term we use here in Maine for Maine Coon cats;) Roxy - you are a very beautiful kitten !!!
  • Heide LevineHeide Levine Member Posts: 313
    edited 3 March, 2008
    SORRY this is LOOOOOONG LoL I'm horrified to see a breeder passing such false and unhealthy ideas to pet owners... What you do with your baby once it's yours is YOUR business. Quite frankly I find their tone highly offensive and they're lucky they haven't been sued yet for their "facts". Now-a-days that's a lawsuit waiting to happen. Royal Canin is all marketing gimmicks... There's no such thing as "breed specific" foods... That would assume that all blood type is purely equal as well as DNA... You might as well be feeding them grocery store quality and save some money for all they're worth...They were part of the huge food recall and they've had quite a lofty few of their own recalls... The only good Royal Canin is the prescription diets compared to Science Diet.. They actually are better in that area... but here is an article on the matter of food in general: You are what you eat, and this is equally true for the cats that depend on us for "room and board." Indeed, cat food is one of the most important expenses of feline guardianship, next to veterinary care. It is important also to note that proper diet can eliminate or delay veterinary expense for a number of serious medical conditions. The ultimate purpose of this series is to help you learn how to read cat food labels to make your decision process easier in choosing the best foods for your cat, but first we need to cover some of the basics. Cats' Basic Nutritional Needs Protein from a meat, fish, or poultry source Taurine, an essential amino acid Certain other vitamins, minerals, enzymes, and fatty acids Water That's it, basically Cats do not need carbohydrates, although corn, wheat, and/or rice are used as fillers for both canned and dry cat foods. Other ingredients, such as binders, flavoring, and coloring, are added by cat food manufacturers to satisfy the aesthetic wants of the consumer. Although preservatives are necessary, to keep foods fresh for our cats, canned food should not be allowed to remain out for any length of time, in any case. Canned food or Kibble? Many nutritionists agree that cats should get a variety of food, both dry and canned, for several reasons: While dry food is convenient, and can be left out for "free feeding," Canned food contains water, and many cats do not drink water regularly To ensure that your cat gets the right amount of nutrients. That "near-perfect" food you've selected might be adding too little (or too much) of certain minerals and/or vitamins. Cats may actually become bored with the same food day in and day out, and simply quit eating. Face it, would you enjoy pizza morning, noon, and night, for years? To head off possible allergies to certain ingredients. Cats (like humans) develop allergies over a period of time. Although the incidence of food allergies in cats is rare, cat owners might want to err on the side of caution, particularly if their cats have shown evidence of allergies in the past. To prevent "food addictions." The Whole Cat Journal, in its October, 2001 issue, cites the case of a cat that was addicted to a particular flavor of a particular brand of cat food, right down to a specific factory and lot number! This kind of addiction can be difficult to deal with when that last can is gone, but can be easily avoided by feeding a variety of foods from the start. This doesn't mean that Fred should get a different food every day, but a variety of high-quality canned foods, supplemented with dry food for cats left alone all day, will add spice to his diet and keep him from becoming "Finicky Fred." Cheaper Brands are False Economy Many first-time cat owners, in an attempt to hold down expenses, buy the cheapest foods they can find for their cats. This is false economy for a couple of reasons. First, studies have shown that cats eat as much as they need to get the nutrients they require. Therefore, they might eat twice as much of that generously-carbohydrate-filled store brand to get the nutrients they need in a normal feeding of premium food. Second, the continued feeding of substandard foods over a period of years will heavily contribute to, or even cause, serious medical conditions that will require expensive veterinary care. For these reasons, the old maxim, "You get what you pay for," is particularly true where it comes to cat food. Although many people rely on dry cat food as a staple for their cats' diets, canned cat food is a must for developing strong bones and muscles, while mitigating many potential conditions caused or contributed to by an all-dry cat food diet. It's true that dry cat food is convenient; it doesn't spoil rapidly, and most cats like the "crunch" of eating dry kibbles. However, dry cat food has its definite "downside." Cats who eat a diet of only dry food are losing out on the extra nutrition they can get with canned cat food. Many commercial dry foods are packed with carbohydrate fillers, usually corn, listed as "corn meal," "ground whole corn," "corn gluten," or even more thinly disguised as "maize," "ground yellow maize" or other misleading names. The ingredients listings are often split, which gives the consumer a false impression of the true proportion of carbohydrate to protein, e.g., "Poultry by-product meal, ground yellow corn, wheat flour, corn gluten meal, soybean meal, brewers rice..." Of the first six listed ingredients of this popular "grocery store premium" brand, four are carbohydrates, with the combined corn ingredients leading the list. I'd pass this food by, simply because of the first listed ingredient, poultry by-product meal, but that's another article. In the wild, a cat will eat only a very small quantity of any grain, namely the stomach contents of mice, rabbits, or birds he catches. Why then, should a pampered household cat eat a diet that is loaded with the one food nutrient he really doesn't need? Although french fries and Twinkies might be tasty treats on occasion, what human would consider living on them day in and day out, much less feed them to their children as a regular diet? Why then, would we do less for our cats? Dry cat food can also contribute or be directly related to certain health conditions: Feline Diabetes Elizabeth Hodgkins, DVM, does not mince words about the connection between dry cat food and feline diabetes. On her web site at www.yourdiabeticcat.com, she states, "Without the constant feeding of highly processed, high carbohydrate dry foods, better suited to cattle than cats, adult-onset feline diabetes would be a rare disease, if it occured at all." IBD (Inflammatory Bowel Disease) Dr. Lisa Pierson, DVM, states, "Too often these cats are treated with a high level of steroids and a so-called 'prescription' DRY diet. I feel very strongly that this common therapeutic regimen needs to be re-evaluated. There are an impressive number of anecdotal reports of cats that were terribly ill with IBD exhibiting dramatic improvement when ALL dry food was removed from their diet." CRF (Chronic Renal Failure) Dr. Lisa Pierson, DVM, states, "It is troubling to think about the role that chronic dehydration plays in feline kidney failure. And remember, cats are chronically dehydrated when they are on a diet of predominantly dry food." Urinary crystals and cystitus The chances of bladder crystals or bladder inflammation are greatly reduced with a canned or raw food diet, which both give the essential hydration needed for a healthy urinary tract. Diarrhea Diarrhea and other allergy-related conditions are often caused by corn or wheat fillers in dry cat food. After eliminating other potential medical causes, switching to canned or raw food can make the diarrhea go away almost overnight. Dehydration Cats on canned food diets or raw food get sufficient water in their food. Cats on dry food alone must be given plenty of water, especially during hot summer months. OMG I'm so sorry this is soooo long... but I thought it was important...
  • Kara DickmanKara Dickman Middle of No WhereMember Posts: 2,283 ✭✭
    edited 3 March, 2008
    RC is a nasty food :-#. By the way, cats do need a small amount of carbohydrates (something to do with maintaining fat). Cats that are feed raw diets get it from organ meat. That is why a raw diet requires liver it is higher then other organs meats. However, most store bought pet foods have way to many carbohydrates.
  • Mary ComminsMary Commins AntiochMember Posts: 55,502
    edited 3 March, 2008
    That breed specific cat food or the indoor specific foods are nothing but a marketing gimmick. We have even read that kitten food is not needed either. How many cats in the wild have breed spoecific or even certain kinds of prey only for kittens?????
  • Vanessa BobackVanessa Boback TampaMember Posts: 3,149
    edited 4 March, 2008
    That whole post really bugged me. I don't like how they are pushing their untrue beliefs on you like that. Royal Canin is not the best you can buy! And if you ask me, canned food is essential for the necessary water and nutrients. We feed a 5 oz can per day of either Innova EVO or Evangers both of which have NO by-products. If I just spent all kinds of money on a new kitten and found out that this is how they behave and think I would be very upset. I would definitely have a word with them and inform them that they don't need to be pushing their opinions on people especially without doing the proper research first!! Yikes!
  • naomi codynaomi cody Charm CityMember Posts: 537
    edited 5 March, 2008
    sounds like an advertisement to us. oh FYI, my vets said that we need to cut down on kibble and start feeding canned 2x a day. they are adamant about that. i don't like wetfood and mom's been having a bear of a time with this. but thay are supposed to be getting a high quality wet food along with kibble. i do agree real meat is a better treat than the stuff on the market though. mom is always giving us a little bit every once in a while.
  • Elizabeth KElizabeth K ChicagoMember Posts: 11,036
    edited 5 March, 2008
    Thanks guys for your opinions! That was pretty much what I thought too when I read it... We are slowly mixing in more and more Orijen with the Royal Canin they sent home with her. =;
  • Heide LevineHeide Levine Member Posts: 313
    edited 6 March, 2008
    "If you have existing cats in your home when your little one arrives, they will be fine eating the Royal Canin Feline Nutrition-Kitten 34. You will likely find they will get right into it and eat as if they are starving. Different breed cats can eat what your kitten eats and they can also eat the Maine Coon 31 when your kitten is old enough to handle it. Your other cats will do well and, believe it when we tell you; they will thrive on Royal Canin. Great food is great food and its fine for your existing cats to eat." This paragraph in and of itself is enough to know that they are getting kick-backs or some kind of reward for using the products... It's so important to feed "breed specific" that it is perfectly fine to feed just this one to ALL other cats??? This one really got to me... There is so much negative talk of how you will be doomed to killing your kitty by not following their words... It reads like God himself commands y0u... I need to zen... This really has me infuriated... I just can't believe that a so called "reputable" breeder is talking like this as if they are the one and only leading authority, and at the same time peddling snake oil as natures pure and perfect food... Ok breathe in... breathe out.... breathe in... breathe out...
  • Elizabeth KElizabeth K ChicagoMember Posts: 11,036
    edited 6 March, 2008
    Monkey what I don't understand is why all these breeders love Royal Canin so much! It's not just this one breeder-- I'm on a few Maine Coon email lists and many of the breeders talk about how great Royal Canin is and recommend it... We almost got a kitten from a different breeder last year who has a totally opposite view-- they actually feed a RAW diet to the kittens which I thought was great...however we had other problems with that breeder and did not end up getting a kitten from them.
  • Heide LevineHeide Levine Member Posts: 313
    edited 6 March, 2008
    Yup I got it... They're not touting the praises of Royal Junk... They're getting real kick backs in food and real money for buying into the "cat breeders club"... It includes the kind of propaganda that your breeder tried on you.. but your breeder went one step further and demanded it... It also includes a kitten "starter kit".. they have to pay for that... so I guess the breeder didn't find it cost effective to actually spend some of that reward money.. just demanded that you go and do it... I was going to paste it here.. but they were clever enough to disable the copy and paste feature on the site... Oh well Not that this is new to any food company... I'm sure there are reputable foods out there that offer the same thing for recommendations and breeders... I'm just not so sure they would choose to behave like your breeder does... Your breeder chose the "demand, belittle, and bulldoze" method. If I were you I'd contact the Royal Canin company and let them know about this little feature letter... Considering Royal Canin makes wet and canned foods.... I'm sure they'd be interested to know that one of their breeders in their program is behaving like this...
  • Elizabeth KElizabeth K ChicagoMember Posts: 11,036
    edited 6 March, 2008
    I think I got a "starter kit"? When I picked up my kitten she came with a Kitten Care Guide and health record sheet (both from Royal Canin) in addition to her CFA registration slip... I have noticed that Royal Canin seems to be a sponsor of CFA which may be partly why so many breeders go for them as well I suppose... I went to a CFA show last month and Royal Canin was giving away free stuff at their booth including bags which contained one of those Kitten Care Guides and other stuff.
  • Kat WhickerKat Whicker ToledoMember Posts: 1,695
    edited 6 March, 2008
    comming from the standpoint of a rescue, pet food companys most certinly do give breaks and cutbacks. we sometimes get free bags of food from certin companys (never the good ones :-/) that come with coupons. while i can understand why a shelter or rescue would feed the bags they can get for discount, a breeder has no excuse. they are suppose to be providing the best care, not feeding what they can order in bulk. but maybe some just dont know there not feeding the best.
  • Karyn LehmannKaryn Lehmann redlandsMember Posts: 247
    edited 8 March, 2008
    By-products are bad but not all canned food has them. Fancy feast is crap in my opinion, funny that they would recommend that but put down all other foods without a thought. Perhaps because Royal Canin is owned by Masterfoods they want to cross promote the lesser of the foods that they make? We feed lots of canned foods, & sell tons! There are great foods out there go to a natural pet food store & read labels. Wellness Merrick Tiki Instinct Natura..Evo & Cal Nat & Innova Weruva to name a few...
  • Cindi GettmanCindi Gettman Member Posts: 80
    edited 8 March, 2008
    The Fancy Feast is crap...but it was not recommended as part of a regular diet. Many cats go nuts for the taste because they add flavor enhancers. It was recommended in place of prepackaged cat treats, which do contain a high fat content. Because the Fancy Feast is formulated as a regular feed it is a much lower fat alternative that will still be seen as a treat. However, a small bite of lean chicken would probably be just as nice for your kitty and much better nutrionally. I do think the breeder is way too heavy-handed. Follow the advice of your vet instead.
  • Denise LottDenise Lott South of TucsonMember Posts: 813
    edited 11 March, 2008
    All I can say is that working for a vet, my mom has heard the absolute worst misinformation from pet breeders time after time (this is when clients say \"My breeder told me to do _____\"). So, she is kinda biased in that regard. : ) Do your own research and feed what YOU want to YOUR cat. There are folks who say dry food is evil and will make your cat sick (no evidence of this) or canned food is evil (no evidence of that, either). Choose a high-quality food, canned and/or dry, that your cat likes and tolerates well, and you should be fine.
  • Valerie DurhamValerie Durham Member Posts: 8,724
    edited 31 March, 2008
    Oooo!!! My furfamily wants to try Royal Canin Maine Coon, but it\'s hard to get in our country. I\'d like to try it to see if I could put some real Maine Coon meat on my awesome Maine Coon frame (longest torso this side of the Pacific!). My human says that reliable breeders who are selling quality cats have a vested interest in feeding them food that will make them healthy, beautiful, strong, and in the case of Maine Coons, big. But there\'s definitely a lot of different variations on what breeders find consists of the best diet. The difference could be the cats, or it could be the breeders. Where we live, there isn\'t as much selection as in the U.S., and breeders seem to be producing fine cats with Hill\'s Science Diet Pro and Nature\'s Best, and Eukanuba--most breeders here free-feed dry food, sometimes with the addition of occasional wet food, with supplementary foods like cats\' milk as needed, and the occasional treats (white chicken meat, microwaved, gets good reviews from breeders and cats alike). Breeders (and cat show participants) have to worry about nutrition the way you would if you were preparing for the Olympics, but the truth of the matter is that our humans are, er, only human, and sometimes can\'t go to the effort to get what someone tells them is the best. Like, my human got all excited about feeding us raw meat until she discovered that breeders who feed a raw meat diet use mostly organ meat and things like beef hearts. Maybe you can get kidneys, stomachs, and hearts in American supermarkets, but not HERE. And my human also was not too enticed by the fact that said cattery made a paste of said organs in a food processor. Now, that might be nutritious and tasty, but how many owners, no matter how loving and dedicated to their cats they are, are going to do that several times a day? Mmmm, make that pate of beef heart for ME. For the record, my Rainbow Bridge step-sister and step-brother lived their entire lives exclusively on Hill\'s Science Diet Adult, which was the only \"quality\" cat food available here at the time, and they lived pretty healthy lives, passing over at 15 and 18, respectively.
  • Heide LevineHeide Levine Member Posts: 313
    edited 31 March, 2008
    Harvey I completely understand that you would think that it is in the best interest of a breeder to have healthy and happy cats they are breeding... Unfortunately in the US there are too many breeders that are fueled by money and sponsership... while the breeder may have a good reputation, it is in their best interest to keep profit high and costs low... Royal Canin uses grain based foods and lots of fillers... and there is no such thing as true "breed specific" formula... it is a gimmick and just an advertising ploy... In order for the concept to be true, you would have to maintain that the blood type and DNA of every cat in the breed is EXACTLY the same... and as we know no living thing has exactly the same DNA or blood... It's tough to make a decision on what to feed when the choices are limited, but here in the US they are not limited... We have the benefit of having junk food with lots of advertising gimmicks all the way to the closest foods to raw you can get (and not be raw)... and for that we are lucky... I don't want to suggest that feeding Royal Canin is the worst thing you could do, but if you are doing it because it is "breed specific" and you are buying into the idea that it's doing your cat some kind of benefit that no other food can? Then I say do your research... Look up pet foods,what ingrediants matter, and why...
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