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Potatoes???

Amber PaineAmber Paine Member Posts: 67
edited 10 November, 2008 in Food & Nutrition
Are potatoes good or bad for cats and dogs? I read somewhere, potatoes are bad because they are in the nightshade family and can cause toxicity and intestinal upset... is that true? I ask because, I have noticed many "grain free" pet foods include potatoes... a substitute for the grains? An inexpensive filler? If potatoes are not bad, are they of any nutritional value for cats and dogs or just fillers? Would the type (i.e. russet) of potato make a difference?

Comments

  • Tina BTina B Vancouver IslandMember Posts: 2,238
    edited 6 November, 2008
    This is taken from messybeast.com Like tomatoes, potatoes are members of the Solanaceae family of plants and are related to Deadly Nightshade. They contain a bitter, poisonous alkaloid called glycoalkaloid solanine that can cause violent lower gastrointestinal symptoms. Uncooked or green potatoes and potato peelings are all toxic. Once cooked, the alkaloid is destroyed making the potato safe. Cooked mashed potato can be safely mixed into canned food as a bulking agent for overweight cats. I feel that potatoes are just used as a filler for cat food instead of grain, basically we have to put up with it if you are feeding a grain free food, hopefully nothing goes wrong and there is uncooked potato in it. Unless of course you feed something like BG merricks which needs supplementation.
  • Sherry StoneSherry Stone Member Posts: 526
    edited 10 November, 2008
    Unfortunately, any and all veg. matter added to the cat food is either filler, or a bulking/thickening agent. Although it probably won't hurt, neither do kitties get anything from it.
  • Amber SimmonAmber Simmon Member Posts: 2,703
    edited 10 November, 2008
    Oh. Def. got to remember that. BeBe was insisting on licking a baked potatoe today so I let him have a small bite.
  • Amber SimmonAmber Simmon Member Posts: 2,703
    edited 10 November, 2008
    Oh. Def. got to remember that. BeBe was insisting on licking a baked potatoe today so I let him have a small bite.
  • Amber PaineAmber Paine Member Posts: 67
    edited 10 November, 2008
    Question, say Origen, for example, says it is cooked for 3-5 minutes at 90c/195f. Would this be sufficiently cook the potato to be not toxic? From their White Paper on the Champion/Origen website: \"Cooking or processing has a major impact on overall protein (and fat) quality. ORIJEN diets have the highest possible fresh meat inclusions from chicken, fish, egg. To preserve protein quality and amino acid integrity, ORIJEN ingredients are low temperature cooked at 90C for 3 – 5 minutes – substantially lower temperature and less time than what most people would cook their dinner. o High temperatures and long exposure to heat alter amino acid chains and lowers the quality of protein. o High temperatures create bonds between protein and carbohydrates, which interferes with protein digestibility (specifically lysine). o High temperature cooking destroys amino acids methionine and histidine.\"
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