I need some advice please

Jessica PuzzoJessica Puzzo WilmingtonMember Posts: 1
edited 12 January, 2009 in Behavior & Training
I am overweight; I weigh about 20 pounds, but the vet says I should be around 12. My mom bought me diet food (even different varieties), but nothing seems to get off my extra weight. Also, mom put me on prozac a few months ago upon recommendation from the vet. You see, I had a problem with peeing on mom and dad while they were sleeping in their bed at night. If they shut me out of the bedroom, I peed and pooped right outside their door. They think this is because I did not have food in my bowl during the night; they wouldn't give me anymore because I had already had my allotted amount for the day and they want me to lose this extra weight so that I do not end up with a shorter life or feline diabetes. Even with the prozac in me, I sometimes poop and pee on the guest bed of our home. I seem to be obsessed with food. I want food in my bowl at all times, and if it is not there, I become passive-aggressive, using my waste products as weapons. Mom even took me to the vet to see if something was wrong with my bladder, but after various testing, the vet said I had a behavioral problem. Most of the time I am a very sweet kitty, who is a little obsessed with his food. Mom doesn't like to have to give me the prozac, but she is willing to try everything possible to help me behave. I used to live with two other cats, and become so large by eating some of their share of our food. I've been living without the other cats now now for 6 months in my mom's new house, but my behavior of peeing on the bed began at my last home, and has continued into my new one. Please give me whatever advice you can about my various naughty behaviors.

Comments

  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 8 January, 2009
    Started and restarted this post, so many times, as I am a little paranoid, mol, and don't want to offend anyone on here. So I will present this as, this was my experience, what I found out, what I did, and what worked for Bumpurr. :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D First I want to say, he is a beautiful beautiful cat, and he looks like a big built cat, and I am not a vet, but that is an awful lot of weight to go down to, in my opinion. Bumpurr is a big built boy too, 20 lbs and the vet only wants him down a few lbs. First I did the research on cat foods. What I found out is, just like with people, its the kind of food they eat, not the amount. I found out, that alot of foods have alot of carbs in them, even the foods avertised as diet foods. What are carbs? Carbs are grains. We feed horses grain, to put weight on them or keep weight on them, depending on the use of the horse, and the metabolizem of the horse. So my mission was to find a food, low in carbs, and/or grain free, which I did do. Another factor, that I found out, just like wih people, is the salt content. Alot of foods, I found, are high in salt. So also had to find a food, that had salt listed, almost at the bottom, which I did that too. I also found out, there is a guide on the bag of food, and this is only a guide, a place to start. Just like with people, some have higher metabalism's, which I can't spell, mol, and some have lower. Some are more active, some are less active. And also on the bag is a coloric guide, which was a little confusing to me, mol, and my vet had to explain this to me. I did the research, and presented the results to my vet, what I felt, would be the correct food, for what she wanted Bumpurr to do. She agreed, and she also ran the info past a vet at one of the universities, forget now if it was UC Davis or WSU, which they also approved it. Probably one of the most important things I also found out, is with a large built cat/overweight cat, like Bumpurr, is it is very important that he not loose the weight too fast, as they are prone to liver issues. I found that I needed to do this very very very slowly. What I also did, that worked for Bumpurr, is start with the amount he was getting now, and very very very slowly decreased it. I did not start with the recommended amount, as I felt that was too drastic a change, and my vet also agreed. She advocates change very very very slowly, and I already knew this from horses. What I also did, that worked for Bumpurr, is divide the amount into several small meals, not just once a day, not just twice a day. And being that I have a multi cat household, and the others did not need to be regulated, and didn't want Bumpurr to get their food too, I feed each cat in their carrier. This way, he only eats what he is supposed to eat, and I can keep tract of weather he is eating, or not eating, as well as the other cats. Nobody gets into anybody else's food, the ones that eat slower, can eat at their leisure, the ones that eat faster, cannot bully the slow ones and steal their food. The first couple of days, he was like feed me, feed me, but he has adjusted very well. I tell them when its time for foodies, and tell them when its not time, you have to wait. I talk to them all the time. I also found out, I could increase his activity, kinda like a person walking or working out. I throw his toys for him, he brings them back, I play with him with the feather toys, and what I found that really worked, is the laser toy. He chases that little red dot all over. I do have to be careful not to shine it in his eyes, as it could blind him. In doing research, I found there is this pet product, that you put the food inside it, and the cat bats it all over, and the crunchies come out one at a time. Its supposed to create the exercise, and it takes longer for them to eat the food, instead of hoovering it. If what I planned to do, did not work, this would of been my plan B, so have no experience with this. This has taken many months, but he has lost 2 lbs, and my vet is very happy with this. Bumpurr has adjusted very well to this and is happy. His tummy must have adjusted to the schedule too, as it is rare he asks for food, before his scheduled time. Hope this has helped, be glad to ans any questions you have, or provide further information, and I hope I have not offended anyone in this presentation. :D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
  • JL GrummerJL Grummer Member Posts: 24
    edited 10 January, 2009
    I disagree with the previous post. Cats do need portion control. There are many grain free foods out there...Wellness, is one of them. That is the food I mostly feed my cats. Also, a raw food diet might be good for the overweight cats also. This cat is supposed to be 12 lbs and it is 20 lbs now...That is 8 pounds overweight. A little less than 50% overweight. So, now you have a cat that is grossly overweight, and at risk for many, many diseases like diabetes and heart problems not to mention asthma and hypertension. Take this cat off the junk food, find another vet who will tell you the truth. You over fed your cat. PERIOD. Find a vet that has experience with overweight pets. Put the cat on a diet that contains HEALTHY food for a cat. No grains, no preservatives. If you insist on using prepackaged foods. Try wellness or some other grain free food. THEN if you must feed the cat dry food...give it like an 1/8 of a cup 2x day..>Don't leave dry food out the whole day and give it a heaping tablespoon 2x day of wet food...Healthy grain free food. The cats eats because it isn't getting enough nutrients in the food you are giving it.>SO it is eating more food to get the nutrition it needs. So basically, you are giving your cat food that ends up to be the equivalent of several boxes of twinkies, cookies and cakes in a human diet. What are you crazy that you don't need to limit the cats food????? The cat might not like it short term..But when the cat is running around like it was when it was about 2...Then the cat will be happy. Remember a cat isn't that big. My Bri Bri Imp is almost 12 lbs. She has a lot of fur and hanging skin. When she is wet, you can tell she is of perfect weight. When she is dry she looks overweight. But, she doesn't over eat on her own. Your cat needs to be put on a diet in order for the cats stomache to shrink. This will in the long run teach the cat how to eat and when enough food is enough. The cats weight is probibily the OWNERS FAULT!!!!! NOT the cats!!!!
  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 10 January, 2009
    What part of the "previous post" do you disagree with?
  • JL GrummerJL Grummer Member Posts: 24
    edited 10 January, 2009
    1-I don't believe in putting cats in carriers to feed them. If you can't train each cat to eat out of their own bowls you have far too many animals. 2-horses eat grain for the nutrients, NOT to gain weight you must have never owned a horse. No grains the horses get sick. 3-portion control is important with any animal. That is why zoo's have animal nutritionists on staff. 4-weight is a growing issue with indoor animals...Carbs is a phenomenon that is a growing concern in HUMANS!!!....Cats need meat to survive...Meat has a lot of carbs. Cats don't process carbs like humans do. It really isn't a problem with cats so much. 5--your salt in the food...Go for a natural food. give the animal a hymmilian salt rock, so if the cat needs minerals from the natural salt rock..Then the cat can decide on its own its needed salt intake. I don't feed foods to my cats with a high salt content. They can work for their salt.
  • Lisa DausmanLisa Dausman Member Posts: 5,216
    edited 10 January, 2009
    1. Feeding them in their carriers, is how I also teach them to load for shows. I open the door, they walk right in, do yours? Mine are not at all afraid of the carriers. I travel up to 7 hrs one way, to shows, they sleep the whole way, how do yours travel in carriers? 2. Being that this is a cat board, and not a horse board, I felt I didn't need to go into great detail about horses and grain, and how it works, they don't need to know and prob don't care, and it was more of a generalization, that I believe grains are not for cats, grains are for horses. I have show horses, can go into great detail of how it works, if ya want to know. "No grains the horses get sick" I have no idea what you mean by that. 3. Your right, portion control is very important, weather it is horses or cats, don't understand what zoo's have to do with it, a knowledgeable horse person or cat person, willing to do the research, can properly feed their animal, don't have to be a nutritionalist to do it. And you would have to point out to me, where in my post, I said portion control is not important. I told the original poster, there is a guide on the bag, and it is only a guide, a place to start. Just as there is a guide on grain bags, it depends on what the horse is being used for, as a generalization, obviously there are more factors to it. And most people don't know, grain and hay, are fed by weight. If ya need me too, can go into great detail on that too. 4. Weight is a growing concern with indoor cats, as with humans, you are correct. Cats don't need meat to survive, and can you tell me what meat has carbs in it? Not going to get into a discussion on weather to feed raw or not. If one wants to do the research, they can properly feed their cat, a nutritious healthy food. What does cats not processing carbs the same way as humans, have to do with anythng? In cat food, the grains are the carbs, in my opinion, cats should be fed a grain free food, which equals low carb. In cats, it is a problem, this is where the prob is. Its the carbs that are putting the weight on, as well as other issues, so you don't jump on me for not being specific enough. Here is a site on proper nutrition, use it or don't use it. http://www.catinfo.org/ 5. Salt, cats need to be fed a low salt diet, especially if the cat has heart issues. Its horses, that are given a salt block. The original poster indicated the cat needed to lose weight, a low salt diet would help.
  • janice lancasterjanice lancaster temple gaMember Posts: 2,505
    edited 12 January, 2009
    Gizmo--I feel your pain . Meowma had to make me lose weight too--but now I actually trot/run now and then, even though I'm old-ish, so I guess it's worth it. Your mommy might find it useful to get a bit creative to make your food last longer, to keep you from leaving so many 'surprises'. For instance, they could put a small amount of food in a big, shallow container--with a bunch of marbles covering 90% of the bottom of the container, so you can get the pieces of food out, but it's some work to do it. (Meowma's aunt uses this way). Or, use the above mentioned toys that have food inside and require work for the kitty to get it out. Good luck!
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